June 23, 2020

Considering Cataract Surgery? 4 Details to Discuss With Your Doctor

Filed under: Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: , , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:50 am

Cataract Surgery for Seniors

By Meghan Belnap 

If you have plans to get cataract surgery, it’s important that know what to expect. Cataract surgery involves removing the lens of the eye and replacing it, giving the patient clear vision. As you learn more about cataract surgery, make sure your ophthalmologist covers the following details.

The Surgery

When performing cataract surgery, doctors use different techniques used to remove the lens. Up until a few years ago, phacoemulsification was the most popular technique for cataract surgery. This process utilizes an ultrasound device to dissolve or emulsify the cataract. Now, many of today’s ophthalmologists use laser-assisted surgery as their procedure of choice for cataract surgery.

When speaking with your doctor about your upcoming surgery, ask them which technique they recommend. In certain cases, an ophthalmologist won’t choose laser cataract surgery as it may not be compatible with the patient’s anatomy.

Lens Type

Another detail to discuss with your doctor is the type of lens that will be used in the surgery. Multifocal intraocular implants are a popular option. This type of lens implant is designed for high-quality intermediate vision, near vision, and distant vision. Ultimately, ophthalmologists hope to provide their clients with glasses-free vision after their surgery, but this isn’t guaranteed.

Recovery

After cataract surgery, you may feel ready to resume regular activities. However, your eye doctor may warn you about inflammation and potential infections. Doctors typically prescribe eye drops and pain relievers for recovery after surgery. In addition to these options, some ophthalmologists recommend steroids.

When it comes to cataract surgery, corticoid steroids are a popular choice for controlling ocular inflammation. Many ophthalmologists choose to use steroids as fast-acting anti-inflammatories after surgery. Be sure to speak with your doctor about using ocular steroids as a treatment for cataract surgery. Working with your ophthalmologist, you can choose a steroid that is effective for you.

How to Prepare

As you consider cataract surgery, make sure to ask your ophthalmologist what preparations you should make. Before cataract surgery, doctors recommend that patients make arrangements with their friends or family prior to cataract surgery. As your eyesight will be compromised following surgery, it’s best to have plans for a ride home once the surgery is over.

In addition to getting home from the ophthalmologist, you’ll need to prepare for the recovery period. Experts recommend a 48-hour recovery period to rest your eyes after cataract surgery. In the event that you live alone, now is the time to plan ahead and ask someone to help.

Knowing what to expect before you schedule your cataract surgery will help you make the best decisions for your health. Keep this information in mind as you follow up with your ophthalmologist about cataract surgery.

Meghan Belnap is a freelance writer who enjoys spending time with her family. She loves being in the outdoors and exploring new opportunities whenever they arise. Meghan finds happiness in researching new topics that help to expand her horizons. You can often find her buried in a good book or out looking for an adventure. You can connect with her on Facebook right here and Twitter right here.

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June 3, 2020

4 Things Every Aging Senior Needs to Know About Stroke

Filed under: Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 10:05 am

Stroke Factors

By Anica Oaks

If you are reaching your older years or know someone who’s a senior, it’s especially important to know about the risks of stroke. These risks increase as people get older, and learning how to recognize certain signs will make it possible for you to take quicker action that may be lifesaving. Here are four important things for every aging senior to know about stroke.

Certain Factors Increase Stroke Risk

In addition to aging, there are certain factors that could increase a senior’s chances of having a stroke. Being overweight is unhealthy at any age, but seniors should be especially diligent about maintaining a healthy weight to try to avoid a stroke. Smoking and eating high-sodium foods that increase blood pressure can also raise a senior’s risk of having a stroke. Having obstructive sleep apnea, which is sometimes more common in seniors and can interfere with breathing while trying to sleep, can further increase stroke risk.

Severe Disability Can Result

People who suffer from strokes are often left with major disabilities that make managing everyday life more difficult. Experiencing a stroke may affect your ability to walk, talk and eat without assistance. A stroke can also cause cognitive effects such as difficulty remembering or rationalizing certain thoughts or emotions. A locum tenens stroke doctor in your area can work with you or a loved one who’s suffered a stroke to try to lessen some of the debilitating effects.

Mini-strokes Can Happen

Not all strokes cause major symptoms or need medical attention right away. Also known as a transient ischemic attack (ITA), a mini-stroke occurs when blood flow to a certain part of the brain is obstructed for a short period. Even though not all mini-strokes are immediate cause for concern, they could be signs that a major stroke will occur in the future. Some of the most common signs of a mini-stroke include sudden headaches, dizziness and partial weakness or numbness.

Family History Often Plays a Role

If any of your family members had a stroke, there could be a genetic factor that will increase your chances of having one as well. This is often especially true if any family member had a stroke at a younger age. It’s important to research the medical histories of parents, grandparents and any siblings to determine if the problem runs in your family.

One of the best ways to ensure better health as a senior is to learn about the risks of having a stroke. Knowing these risks will help you take the appropriate measures to keep yourself and any other seniors in your life safer.

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May 11, 2020

How to Help Seniors Struggling with Eating Disorders

Filed under: Meal Planning,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 9:37 am

By Brooke Chaplan

As people get older, they sometimes develop eating problems based on various medical conditions. Certain medicines can cause people to eat more or less than they should. Health problems with lethargy and dementia, for example, might cause seniors to miss meals or not be able to maintain adequate nutrition. Here are some ways you can help older individuals eat better.

Eating Disorders in SeniorsServe Favorites

Most people enjoy a few favorite foods. For some, it might be creamed spinach, and for others, roast chicken. Give the senior a choice of several favorites, and be sure to include nutritious foods or a healthy option. Check with the person or his or her doctor to find out which foods are recommended for someone in the elder’s condition. Even if a favorite is not that healthy, offer it now and then as part of a balanced meal.

Offer Healthy Snacks

Although some seniors do not always eat healthy meals, they sometimes enjoy nutritious snacks, depending on their general physical and dental health. Fresh fruits and veggies with yogurt dip, walnuts or cashews, cheese or peanut butter with whole wheat crackers, and low-fat ice cream may be enjoyable treats that will help to supplement an eating pattern that is not as nutritious or complete as it should be.

Reorganize Dining Times

Seniors’ eating schedules can occasionally get off kilter due to restless sleep, a medical issue, or bathroom issues. If possible, rearrange their dining plan so they can eat the main meal at lunch, for example, or have dinner a little earlier or later than usual. Adjusting meal times can make it easier for seniors to eat when they’re hungry rather than when food is placed before them.

Consult a Professional

Some seniors develop serious eating problems that can lead to a drastic weight change and may even harm their health. When the situation seems to escalate beyond normal, contact the person’s doctor for advice. You might also consult an expert nutritionist about treatment options for eating disorders for an elderly person. Sometimes it becomes necessary to make minor changes to the person’s habits or schedule, and a professional may be able to offer suggestions that will help.

Good nutrition is important for everyone, and especially for older people whose health may be impacted by serious medical conditions or deteriorating immunity. Try tips like these to support a senior’s need for nutrition or contact a professional who can help.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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January 27, 2020

Step Past Your Joint Pain with These 4 Practices

Filed under: Mobility,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 4:33 pm

By Anita Ginsburg

Joint pain and stiffness from arthritis can be daily challenges. While conventional treatments work to control inflammation and slow disease progression, there are natural therapies that can play an important role in how you feel.

Joint pain affects people of all ages, but it is most commonly seen in people over 65. While most physicians choose to treat joint pain with over-the-counter medications and alternative therapies, it’s important to find what works best for you. Oral medications can help, but they aren’t the only way to treat joint pain. Below are four ways to minimize your symptoms naturally.

Lose Weight

Weight loss is one of easiest and most effective ways to treat some forms of joint pain. Even an extra ten pounds adds undue stress on already tender joints. People suffering from osteoarthritis or other forms chronic pain may see a reduction in symptoms when they lose weight.

The best place to start is with your diet. Identify foods that contribute to weight gain and cut them out of your diet. Simply avoiding soft drinks and foods high in sugar can result in weight loss.

Topical Treatments

There are a lot of topical preparations to treat joint pain. Ice or heat therapy can help, and some people find that alternating both is helpful. There are also creams that can help. Topical treatments anesthetize the nerve endings in your skin, which can help minimize the ache.

Because CBD fights inflammation, CBD cream for arthritis pain can minimize joint stiffness. With some of CBD’s other benefits, you may also experience an alleviation of feelings of anxiety.

Physical Therapy

Physical and occupational therapy can also help reduce pain due to arthritis. Although painful in the moment, gentle movement can ease joint pain in the short term. Stillness or avoiding using the affected joints only exacerbates the issue. An occupational or physical therapist can teach gentle range of motion exercises and stretching, which you can do at home as well. Gentle massage can also be effective form of treatment.

Stay Active

Regular exercise does more than keep you slim. It also boosts flexibility and mobility. Even tiny calf pumps and arm circles can help keep your joints pliable. Try performing low-impact aerobic exercise, like walking.

You can also try yoga, which is good for both your body and mind. In yoga, you may also learn mindfulness and how to meditate. Both treatments can help reduce anxiety and the pain that goes along with it.

Living with chronic pain can take over your life. And while it’s easy to fall into thinking that you’ll never be pain free, that’s simply not true. There are things that can minimize joint pain and help you get back to living. Positivity thinking can do things modern medicine can’t.

Bio: Anita is a freelance writer from Denver, CO. She studied at Colorado State University, and now writes articles about health, business, family and finance. A mother of two, she enjoys traveling with her family whenever she isn’t writing. You can follow her on Twitter @anitaginsburg.

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November 29, 2019

Staying Safe and Warm During the Winter Months—A Guide for Seniors

Filed under: Aging,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 8:55 am

seniors health

By Lizzie Weakley

As you get older, your metabolism slows down and your circulation decreases. Common aging-related diseases like diabetes and hypothyroidism can also decrease your cold tolerance. This means that seniors are especially vulnerable to winter dangers like hypothermia, frostbite and pneumonia. Read on to learn how you can stay warm and safe during the coldest months of the year.

Dress in Layers

Bundling up in layers is a great way to stay warm in any temperature because you easily remove outer layers indoors or if the weather changes. Try a long-sleeved shirt under a cardigan with a jacket on top or a hooded sweatshirt with a cotton tee underneath. Accessories like scarves and gloves add extra warmth.

Drink Hot Beverages

A mug of hot cocoa, a cup of hot tea or some java from the corner coffee shop can warm you up from the inside. Holding the hot container can also keep your hands warm. If drinks aren’t your thing, try a steaming bowl of soup or a hot slice of apple pie.

Adjust the Thermostat

Turning the heat up is an obvious way to keep warm, but high heating bills and malfunctioning HVAC systems can be an obstacle for many seniors. If you or someone you love can’t afford to stay warm, look into special programs that help seniors cover energy bills in the winter or pay for heating repair services.

Reverse Ceiling Fans

Your ceiling fan provides a nice cooling breeze in the summer, but did you know that it can also help you stay warm in the winter? Reversing the blades on your fans pushes warm air down into the room to keep you cozy instead of wasting it at ceiling-level. Most new fans have a small switch you can flip to change their direction.

Take Warm Baths

There’s nothing like a warm bath to take off the chill, but remember to be safe in the tub. Install grab bars to help you get in and out, use non-slip bathmats and a bath chair if needed. Check the temperature of your bath with a thermometer to prevent burns. Water that seems fine to the touch may be too hot for soaking. You can get help from a loved one or an assistant if you have trouble getting in the bath.

Although it’s normal to need the thermostat turned up as you grow older, being cold constantly even when the temperature is very warm can be a sign of something serious. If you suddenly get cold more easily than usual or find it difficult to keep warm, schedule an appointment with your doctor.

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November 8, 2019

5 Tips for Dealing with Chronic Pain as a Senior

Filed under: Aging,Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 5:02 am

elderly pain management

By Lizzie Weakley

As we get older, our bodies may begin to require more care and might function less efficiently than when we were younger. After decades of wear and tear, our joints, muscles, and bones begin to ache from years of service. In addition, the older we get, the risk for a chronic illness increases, which may cause chronic pain or discomfort. Fortunately, there are ways to deal with this problem that are both practical and affordable. Check with your doctor before trying any of these tips.

Routine Exercise

Depending on your age and overall health, your doctor may give you approval for starting an exercise program. This can be done at home by watching an exercise program for persons whose circumstances, like age and health, are similar to yours. Alternately, the doctor may suggest joining a local YMCA or recreation center exercise class that meets at least weekly. Exercise can help to strengthen bones while making joints and muscles more limber. Systematic exercise also may stimulate the production of your body’s endorphins, which can ease pain and help you feel better. The immune system may also benefit and contribute to the reduction of inflammation.

Healthy Eating

Avoid inflammatory foods like sugar, and for some, white flour or gluten, may ease physical discomfort. Weight reduction for obese persons can take extra pounds off of the body frame, also reducing physical discomfort. Certain foods or a specific eating plan may be suggested by your doctor or a nutrition specialist to ensure you are getting all the nutrients your body needs to function efficiently, which may in turn lessen physical pain.

Relaxation

If you are a busy person with chronic pain, it may be a good idea to spend some time each day relaxing and escape stress temporarily. Taking a short nap or enjoying nature in the back yard or at the park provides a break from your daily routine, which also have a positive effect on chronic pain levels.

Medical Pain Management

Your GP may provide a referral to pain management doctors who can treat your discomfort from a medical perspective. With many treatment options to choose from, there is a good chance they can find ways to make you feel more comfortable. Pain management experts have the skills and knowledge needed to assist with chronic pain issues.

There is no need to suffer pain in silence. Try tips like these to get your pain under control so you can enjoy a more comfortable lifestyle.

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio. In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and walks in the park with her three-year-old husky, Snowball.

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October 25, 2019

Always on the Go: Maintain Your Mobility as You Age

Filed under: Aging,Mobility,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 5:04 am

Seniors maintaining mobility

By Anita Ginsburg 

Unfortunately, our bodies tend to become weaker, frailer and less agile as time goes on. As a result, we become slower and our reflexes aren’t as sharp. However, that doesn’t mean it has to be this way. There are plenty of ways to keep your body in top form. Granted, this isn’t something that will magically happen nor will it happen overnight. Keep reading for tips on maintaining mobility as you age.

Eat a Nutritional Diet

Having a nutritional, well-balanced diet is one of the best ways to maintain mobility. In fact, one of the most common reasons why our bodies deteriorate is because of a poor diet. Constantly eating things that are high in fat, sugar and preservatives is not healthy, especially for older people.

In fact, we can start to lose muscle mass as early as the age of 30. Make sure to incorporate a lot of fruits, vegetables, grains and nuts into your diet every day. A good way to stay on track is to fill your plate with at least 70 percent fruits and veggies and 30 percent protein.

Manage Your Weight

Eating a healthy diet is beneficial, however, it won’t mean much if you’re overweight. Being overweight not only makes moving harder, it’s also really detrimental to your health. Being overweight is proven to cause health problems such as diabetes, which requires an ongoing medical supply of insulin. As such, it is important that you do everything in your power to maintain a healthy weight.

Exercising is one of the best ways to maintain your mobility while keeping your body healthy. Exercise is also good for our joints. Our joints become more vulnerable to injuries and damage due to the lack of synovial fluid and the cartilage becoming thinner. If you need equipment to help you stay on your feet longer for walks or errands, visit a local medical supply. While it’s important to move around as much as you can, don’t push your body past its limits by ignoring mobility tools available to you.

Take Vitamins

It is essential that everyone consumes the necessary amount of vitamins every day. However, everyone is different and may not be able to consume certain foods or drinks to do so. This is where vitamins come in. You can get vitamins through your local pharmacy or have them prescribed by your doctor. Vitamins are especially essential for people who have certain deficiencies.

Lacking the proper mobility can affect more than our physical health. It also affects our well-being. We might start to lose interest in hobbies, become depressed and we even start to isolate ourselves. Maintaining your mobility will certainly help prevent any of the above-mentioned issues from happening. Make an effort every day to follow these tips and you just might feel like you’re a teen again.

Anita is a freelance writer from Denver, CO. She studied at Colorado State University, and now writes articles about health, business, family and finance. A mother of two, she enjoys traveling with her family whenever she isn’t writing. You can follow her on Twitter @anitaginsburg.

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October 16, 2019

Winter Blues: How The Season Affects Senior Sleep

Filed under: Aging,Seniors,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:29 am

Sleep for Seniors

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), also known as the Winter Blues, affects millions of people every year. A form of depression that occurs at the same time every year, with symptoms diminishing when Spring weather arrives, the likelihood of a SAD diagnosis increases as we age — and seniors who are housebound are especially at risk.

One of the most frustrating aspects of SAD is that it often mimics the symptoms of other illnesses. Seniors exhibiting symptoms of the Winter Blues have been diagnosed with everything from thyroid problems to mononucleosis, often because they don’t make the connection between their symptoms appearing every year and improving with the weather, and because the disruption to their sleep cycles, mood, and behavior is so extreme. For that reason, it’s important for seniors and their caregivers to understand the symptoms of SAD, so they can help ensure a correct diagnosis and the right treatment.

Understanding The Winter Blues

For many people, just the thought of Winter is enough to bring them down. The idea of being stuck inside, with short days, freezing temperatures, and mountains of snow and ice outside, isn’t always appealing. Winter weather can disrupt your usual routine, preventing you from visiting with friends or taking your daily stroll, which can lead to sadness.

It’s not just the disappointment and boredom that can come with Winter weather that causes, SAD, though. Although researchers aren’t certain of the exact cause, it’s believed that the disorder is due to changes in the amount of natural light exposure during the Winter season. The shorter days and longer nights, and in northern climates, the changes in the angle of sunlight, are disruptive to natural circadian rhythms, or the sleep-wake cycle. This disruption disrupts the body’s production of serotonin, a brain chemical that affects mood. Without enough natural sunlight each day, serotonin levels fall, causing symptoms of depression — and significant changes to the sleep cycle.

SAD and Sleep

Although SAD causes many of the classic symptoms of depression — withdrawal, changes in appetite, changes in mood, loss of interest in activities — but changes to sleep patterns are some of the most common. The Winter Blues can cause increases in sleep for seniors, especially during the day, but it can also contribute to insomnia.

Many of these sleep changes are attributable to the changes in ambient light during the day. The human body is naturally attuned to the cycle of day and night. When that cycle changes, and there is more darkness than light or vice versa, the sleep-wake cycle is disrupted. This is only exacerbated by the natural tendency for circadian rhythms to chance as we get older. In general, as we age, we become sleepier earlier in the day, and wake up earlier in the day. But when the sun starts going down at 3 p.m., as it does in some northern climates, that could mean a very early bedtime for some people.

One of the most interesting aspects of the effect of SAD and sleep is the fact that many people report symptoms of insomnia during the Winter, when in fact, they don’t have insomnia at all. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh found that people with SAD often report that they have insomnia, when they are in fact getting just as much sleep as usual. The difference? They typically spend more time in bed, because the seasonal changes cause them to spend up to four hours a day more resting than usual. The perception is that this extra time resting is insomnia — or sleeping to excess — when in fact they’re getting the same amount of actual sleep as usual.

Still, the fact that the Winter Blues can have such an effect on sleep patterns is cause for concern. There are things you can do, though, to support better sleep during the Winter, and reduce the effect of SAD.

Supporting Healthy Sleep 

Encouraging healthy sleep for any age during the Winter months is important for maintaining overall well-being, but it’s especially important for older adults. It’s possible to reduce the symptoms of SAD and improve sleep with a few changes to the daily routine.

    • Consider investing in a “happy light.” Using a special, full-spectrum lamp for a short time every day can help regulate the circadian rhythms and improve mood.
    • Start the day with some exercise. Exercising each day is a key part of healthy sleep. Take a short walk outdoors in the morning if possible, or do a simple indoor workout during bad weather.
    • Practice good sleep hygiene. Create a sleeping area that’s conducive to sleep: Dark, cool, and comfortable. Establish a bedtime routine to encourage sleep; for instance, go to bed at the same time every night, take a warm bath, read, or use specific lotions to indicate it’s time for bed.

 

  • Limit caffeine and alcohol intake.

 

  • Avoid long afternoon naps. If you need to rest, only sleep for 20-30 minutes.
  • Talk with your doctor. If you’re experiencing symptoms of depression or trouble sleeping, your doctor can help by recommending lifestyle changes, further testing to rule out other issues, or prescribing medication.

The good news about the Winter Blues is that they are temporary, and when Spring comes, the symptoms will disappear. There’s no need to suffer in the meantime though. Understanding what’s happening and taking steps to get plenty of sleep can help alleviate the effects and keep you healthy all season long.

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October 12, 2019

4 Solutions to Soothe Arthritic Pain

Filed under: Aging,Mobility,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 8:41 am

Arthritis in Senios

By Anica Oaks

Arthritis is a name given to a large group of degenerative and painful conditions. They’re all similar in the fact that they are marked by inflammation in the joints of the body. This condition results in pain and stiffness for seniors. Here are four solutions that can help to soothe away your arthritic pain at home.

Hot and Cold Therapy

While this may not seem like a big treatment, it’s very effective for arthritic-related pain. Opt for a long, warm bath or shower in the morning. This will reduce stiffness in the joints. Even a heated blanket or heating pad utilized at night can allow your joints to stay loose the next morning. Reserve cold treatments for relieving the joint swelling and inflammation when it gets to its worst.

Compression Sleeves

You can typically find compression sleeves at your local pharmacy. They will likely have all sorts of sleeves including ones for ankle compression, elbow compression, knee compression, and so forth. The concept behind this type of treatment is that it applies a mild compression to the area that regularly receives inflammation. The compression helps to reduce the amount of inflammation that occurs, which translates to less arthritic pain for you.

Low-Impact Exercise

While your first instinct may be not to move the painful joints, you must reconsider. Low-impact movement can help to loosen up the muscles around the joints. This provides less possibility of inflammation around the joints. You’ll notice that the irritated joints will be more flexible and have less pain when you move them. If you have access to a pool, then doing any sort of exercise in the water is considered low-impact for your joints.

Massage Therapy

Regular massaging of the joints that get inflamed can help to reduce the amount of inflammation in the future. This results in less pain and stiffness for you. With regular massage, you’ll get an improved range of motion that can allow you to be more mobile throughout your everyday life. Talk with a physical therapist about self-massage techniques that you can use for your specific arthritic-related pain.

Relieving arthritic pain doesn’t always have to be done with medication. Rather, the above are some very effective treatment solutions that you can utilize at home to alleviate your pain. Be sure to try various treatment solutions to see which ones your body best responds to and stick with those in the future to help manage your arthritic pain.

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October 7, 2019

4 Ways for Seniors to Improve Their Sleep at Home

Filed under: Aging in Place,Seniors,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 4:41 am

Better Sleep for Seniors

By Meghan Belnap

As we age, it becomes harder to be comfortable. Getting a good night’s rest seems impossible. Seniors can be extremely sensitive to things like temperature and light changes. The National Institute of Health says older people get less sleep and the quality of the rest is not as good as for younger individuals. After age 60, nearly half of seniors experience difficulty sleeping. We talk about four ways the elderly can get the most out of a nap or a night’s rest below.

Warm up the feet to stay cozy

Surprisingly, many people find cold extremities keep them awake. If you always have cold feet, then maybe a thick pair of socks, compression hose, or heated stockings can make a difference. Most heat loss comes out of the top of the head, so wearing a cap to sleep may help some people who can tolerate the feeling while slumbering.

Add thermal room darkening curtains to the bedroom

Nothing disrupts a good nap or a night’s sleep than a bright light. When your sleep rhythm is off, it may be necessary to nap during the day. To get the best rest while the sun is up, a set of light-reducing drapes can make a huge difference. Using a brand with thermal linings can reduce any drafts from windows keeping the bedroom temperature more even. Plus, the curtains can help save energy costs by reducing heat transfer.

Splurge for an adjustable mattress

Mattress sales offer the biggest discounts around the holidays and at the end of winter. Early spring works when you need to find a deal on replacing your bed. If your mattress is over eight years old, then it is a good idea to upgrade your bed. Selecting a model with cooling technologies or functions like raising and lowering the head and legs can make getting to sleep easier. Some people say they get a better nights sleep because they can stay asleep longer without achy legs or stiffness in the back and hips.

Use ambient sound makers

Do you have a favorite nighttime noise like crickets or frogs? Maybe the sound of rain on a tin roof or a river babbling over pebbles is soothing. Ambient sound machines are helpful for some seniors who need white noise to drift off to sleep. Sleep apps and playlists on Internet music sites can also help a person drown out the ringing in the ears to get more sleep.

While we lose the refreshing feeling of sleep as we age, there are things we can do to get a better night’s sleep. Making the room and the bed comfortable is an excellent start. Choosing a quiet place and introducing welcome sounds is another way to fall asleep faster. Individuals with dementia and other health issues may not sleep well at night. Creating a comfortable space for napping at any hour may help older individuals get a better quality of rest.


Meghan Belnap is a freelance writer who enjoys spending time with her family. She loves being in the outdoors and exploring new opportunities whenever they arise. Meghan finds happiness in researching new topics that help to expand her horizons. You can often find her buried in a good book or out looking for an adventure.

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