July 16, 2020

Seven Things You Can Do to Get Your Elderly Parents To Stop Complaining

Filed under: Caregivers,Home Health Care,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 12:53 pm

Seven Ways to Get Parents to Stop Complaining

Sponsored by: EasyLiving Fl Home Care & Care Management

Do you dread getting on the phone with your elderly parents? Is every visit filled with complaints? Are you left feeling you can do nothing right? Today, our experts will share common complaints from elderly parents and the underlying emotions. Understanding what’s behind the complaints will reveal solutions. We’ll address seven key complaints. And, we’ll offer ideas, resources, and options.

“You’re always in a rush.”

Other related complaints you might hear include: “I never see the grandkids anymore.” Or, “Why don’t you have time for me?”

This and other complaints may have their roots in loneliness. About half of seniors report feeling lonely on a regular basis. Have your elderly parents cut down on favorite activities? They may be bored and isolated, which leads to them focusing on you.

On the other hand, they might feel rushed during the time you do have together. Maybe rightly so. You likely have a lot of tasks and competing demands. You’re just trying to be helpful and get things done for them. But, it’s easy to become a taskmaster and lose the normal parent-child relationship.

Resources

  • A senior companion/concierge service can help Mom or Dad continue their favorite activities. Our companions have great success engaging elders and offering them a new lease on life.
  • Give yourselves the gift of quality time. Enlist someone to handle certain tasks so you can set aside “us time”. You could hire a care manager to attend doctor’s appointments or organize paperwork, a gardener/lawn service, or a caregiver to do light housekeeping or grocery shopping. There may be community services, friends or family members who can help out too.
  • Schedule a regular time together. This might be a weekly dinner or outing. If you live far away, plan to Skype/Facetime once a week to catch up. Put it on your calendar and theirs. Set aside focused time. This may help to cut down on phone calls when you’re distracted by a million things.
  • Check out two great books on this topic, with ideas for handling these conversations. How to Say it to Seniors by David Solie and Another Country: Navigating the Emotional Terrain of Our Elders by Mary Pipher

“You never help me.”

Some elderly parents don’t say this directly but have a lot of complaints about things that need to be done. Or, the conversational tone will always be “woe is me” or martyrdom. They might complain about how tired they are or list all their tasks. Other parents pointedly talk about all the marvelous things that their neighbor’s son does for him.

Help for you both

You probably do a lot for them. And, you’re probably stretched thin with all your roles. It’s not a cop-out to hire someone to help. You don’t want your elderly parents hurting themselves doing things they shouldn’t. But, the reality is you can’t do it all either…and still be the son/daughter.

Pick out a few key tasks and bring in some help. Explain your boundaries and ask them to give it a try. Enlist help from a sibling or professional if you get resistance. Alternatively, get them to try it for a project or short-term need. You can’t control how they behave, but you’re in control of your boundaries and how you react. However, because we have a long, often complicated, history with our parents this can be tough. If you’re struggling, consider talking this through with a professional.

“You just want to put me in a home.”

This is often accompanied by complaints about other people’s kids or today’s society. “How awful, they just dump their elderly relatives in a home.” They may tell you horror stories of someone’s facility experiences.

Realistic reassurances

Don’t promise something specific that might not be realistic. For example, don’t say “I will NEVER let you go to a facility.” Instead, reassure them that this isn’t your intention and suggest meeting with a professional to make a plan.

You can actually turn this complaint into an opportunity! Get a geriatric care management assessment to make an “aging in place plan”. The care manager will assess the home for possible safety issues. She will suggest resources. (Check out our aging-in-place checklist for some recommended resources.) The plan will prioritize what needs to be done now along with future planning. Clients and families both find this process hugely reassuring.

“You’re always nagging me. Stop telling me what to do. I’m not your child.”

Every nice chat turns into a fight. You are just trying to tell Mom what she needs to do to stay healthy. A genuine concern about Dad’s safety makes him feel like he is being disrespected. The dynamics of eldercare can be quite complicated. After all, these are your parents, not your children.

It’s all in the approach

Get some advice on how to approach the situation. You might just do a phone consult with a care manager to start. Or, you might want the reassurances of that comprehensive assessment.

Here is a small snippet of one family’s success story getting “unstuck” with the help of a care manager:

Julie (care manager) was especially helpful as we all flew in for a “loving intervention”. If it were not for Julie’s one-on-one time with our mother, and the wise counsel and respect she gave to her, I am convinced we would still be stuck…and sick with worry. Instead, Julie empowered Mom to face the next chapter of her life. She also coached us on how to have a loving intervention…

“I’m completely trapped now that I can’t drive.”

Driving was the main lunchtime topic on a recent visit to my grandfather. He willingly, though reluctantly, gave up driving. His memory is a little muddy as to how that came about at times, but he never forgets the loss. Fortunately, the family made an action plan before even approaching the driving conversation. He has a driver all lined up to help with trips that are not included at his retirement community. He set aside the funds from selling his car to pay for this.

Drive to thrive

If your parent is reliant on you or friends for rides, they will complain. Wouldn’t you? Furthermore, the results may be worse if they don’t complain about it but simply withdraw from activities. A lot of unhappiness and complaining may stem from being lonely and depressed. Make sure to set up a realistic plan so they can thrive without driving. This may include some combination of senior transportation services and a private driver.

Ride services provide a lot of freedom, especially for on-demand rides. Until recently, that required having a smartphone and navigating an app. Not all elderly parents want to (or can) do that. Now, you can request Uber and Lyft from a computer. Or even better, EasyLiving with Lyft Concierge can handle it all for you with just a phone call!

“Your sister…”

Does Dad constantly talk about what a disappointment your brother is? Or, does Mom pit you against (or compare you to) your siblings? On the other hand, you may find yourself in an ongoing battle with your siblings. Perhaps you are not on the same page regarding what Mom and Dad need. Or, one of you lives nearby and the other far away. The caregiving situation may seem unbalanced.

Family mediation

It may be time to get someone to intervene. A good resource to get started is this article our care management team wrote about dealing with family conflict in eldercare.

“I’m tired of eating TV dinners.”

A lot goes into meal preparation. This can get tough as someone gets older. It’s also difficult cooking for one. Plus, elderly parents’ appetites and nutritional needs often change. And moreover, most people don’t like eating alone. All this adds up to many seniors eating TV dinners or subsisting solely on snacks and sweets.

Solutions

  • Use a grocery delivery service like Shipt to deliver fresh foods. Eliminate the hassle of shopping. The healthier foods in the house, the less likely they’ll turn to canned goods and frozen meals.
  • Hire a meal prep caregiver to come in four hours/week. She can do some light housekeeping and prepare healthy meals for the week.
  • Plan a Sunday lunch together. Enjoy a weekly meal where you prepare some of Mom or Dad’s favorites. Stash some leftovers for them to eat throughout the week, or provide some extra meals they can reheat. More than the food itself, the focused time together matters (see #1).
  • If you live far away or sense your elderly parents hate eating alone, consider hiring someone for both meal prep and companionship. If you already have a caregiver involved, take this into consideration in scheduling. Sometimes we think of tasks Mom needs to be done but forget about this key ingredient. Why not have the caregiver come around lunch or dinner so they can also provide mealtime companionship?

Check out more ideas, including meal delivery services, in our post How To Help Dad with Better Nutrition: Three Delicious Ways.

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June 23, 2020

Considering Cataract Surgery? 4 Details to Discuss With Your Doctor

Filed under: Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: , , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:50 am

Cataract Surgery for Seniors

By Meghan Belnap 

If you have plans to get cataract surgery, it’s important that know what to expect. Cataract surgery involves removing the lens of the eye and replacing it, giving the patient clear vision. As you learn more about cataract surgery, make sure your ophthalmologist covers the following details.

The Surgery

When performing cataract surgery, doctors use different techniques used to remove the lens. Up until a few years ago, phacoemulsification was the most popular technique for cataract surgery. This process utilizes an ultrasound device to dissolve or emulsify the cataract. Now, many of today’s ophthalmologists use laser-assisted surgery as their procedure of choice for cataract surgery.

When speaking with your doctor about your upcoming surgery, ask them which technique they recommend. In certain cases, an ophthalmologist won’t choose laser cataract surgery as it may not be compatible with the patient’s anatomy.

Lens Type

Another detail to discuss with your doctor is the type of lens that will be used in the surgery. Multifocal intraocular implants are a popular option. This type of lens implant is designed for high-quality intermediate vision, near vision, and distant vision. Ultimately, ophthalmologists hope to provide their clients with glasses-free vision after their surgery, but this isn’t guaranteed.

Recovery

After cataract surgery, you may feel ready to resume regular activities. However, your eye doctor may warn you about inflammation and potential infections. Doctors typically prescribe eye drops and pain relievers for recovery after surgery. In addition to these options, some ophthalmologists recommend steroids.

When it comes to cataract surgery, corticoid steroids are a popular choice for controlling ocular inflammation. Many ophthalmologists choose to use steroids as fast-acting anti-inflammatories after surgery. Be sure to speak with your doctor about using ocular steroids as a treatment for cataract surgery. Working with your ophthalmologist, you can choose a steroid that is effective for you.

How to Prepare

As you consider cataract surgery, make sure to ask your ophthalmologist what preparations you should make. Before cataract surgery, doctors recommend that patients make arrangements with their friends or family prior to cataract surgery. As your eyesight will be compromised following surgery, it’s best to have plans for a ride home once the surgery is over.

In addition to getting home from the ophthalmologist, you’ll need to prepare for the recovery period. Experts recommend a 48-hour recovery period to rest your eyes after cataract surgery. In the event that you live alone, now is the time to plan ahead and ask someone to help.

Knowing what to expect before you schedule your cataract surgery will help you make the best decisions for your health. Keep this information in mind as you follow up with your ophthalmologist about cataract surgery.

Meghan Belnap is a freelance writer who enjoys spending time with her family. She loves being in the outdoors and exploring new opportunities whenever they arise. Meghan finds happiness in researching new topics that help to expand her horizons. You can often find her buried in a good book or out looking for an adventure. You can connect with her on Facebook right here and Twitter right here.

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June 10, 2020

Finding a Senior-Friendly Apartment Complex for Elderly Family

Filed under: Active Adult,Assisted Living,Senior Housing — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 4:19 pm

Senior Living Apartments

By Brooke Chaplan

If you are helping your elderly family find a new place to live, you may want to consider a senior-friendly apartment complex. This way, you know they are moving into a place designed with their comfort, convenience and safety in mind. Use the following tips to find a senior-friendly apartment complex for your elderly family.

Narrow Your Search

The first thing you want to do is narrow down your search to your criteria. You want to look into communities that are specifically designed for seniors rather than a standard apartment community. It is also important to consider the age range of your elderly family. There are some places that only allow seniors over the age of 55 years old or 62 years old to move into the community.

Independent or Assisted Living

You also want to decide if you are looking for an independent or assisted living community for your elderly family. If your seniors can take care of their daily tasks and activities, they may be happier in an independent living community. However, your seniors may need an assisted living community if they cannot handle tasks such as bathing, grooming and dressing on their own.

Research the Amenities

If you are looking for luxury apartments for rent for your elderly family, you want to check out the amenities of the apartments and overall community. The apartment amenities may include large walk-in showers, temperature control and safety features. Your seniors may also have access to a community lounge, dining room and recreational activities. There are also communities that offer housekeeping, transportation and emergency staff.

Read the Reviews

You can also determine if a senior-friendly community is a good fit for your family by reading the reviews on apartment websites. Residents and their loved ones are not going to hesitate to share their positive and negative experiences. If a community has more negative reviews than positive reviews, you want to cross that community off your list.

Schedule A Tour

Once you find a senior-friendly community that fits your criteria, contact the staff to set up a tour. The pictures and information on the website may not do the community any justice, and an in-person tour of the community gives your elderly family a glimpse of their possible home. You may even be able to decide on the spot if it is a good community for your loved ones.

If you take the time to find a senior-friendly apartment complex that fits your criteria, you are sure to find a community that is perfect for your elderly family.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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June 3, 2020

4 Things Every Aging Senior Needs to Know About Stroke

Filed under: Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 10:05 am

Stroke Factors

By Anica Oaks

If you are reaching your older years or know someone who’s a senior, it’s especially important to know about the risks of stroke. These risks increase as people get older, and learning how to recognize certain signs will make it possible for you to take quicker action that may be lifesaving. Here are four important things for every aging senior to know about stroke.

Certain Factors Increase Stroke Risk

In addition to aging, there are certain factors that could increase a senior’s chances of having a stroke. Being overweight is unhealthy at any age, but seniors should be especially diligent about maintaining a healthy weight to try to avoid a stroke. Smoking and eating high-sodium foods that increase blood pressure can also raise a senior’s risk of having a stroke. Having obstructive sleep apnea, which is sometimes more common in seniors and can interfere with breathing while trying to sleep, can further increase stroke risk.

Severe Disability Can Result

People who suffer from strokes are often left with major disabilities that make managing everyday life more difficult. Experiencing a stroke may affect your ability to walk, talk and eat without assistance. A stroke can also cause cognitive effects such as difficulty remembering or rationalizing certain thoughts or emotions. A locum tenens stroke doctor in your area can work with you or a loved one who’s suffered a stroke to try to lessen some of the debilitating effects.

Mini-strokes Can Happen

Not all strokes cause major symptoms or need medical attention right away. Also known as a transient ischemic attack (ITA), a mini-stroke occurs when blood flow to a certain part of the brain is obstructed for a short period. Even though not all mini-strokes are immediate cause for concern, they could be signs that a major stroke will occur in the future. Some of the most common signs of a mini-stroke include sudden headaches, dizziness and partial weakness or numbness.

Family History Often Plays a Role

If any of your family members had a stroke, there could be a genetic factor that will increase your chances of having one as well. This is often especially true if any family member had a stroke at a younger age. It’s important to research the medical histories of parents, grandparents and any siblings to determine if the problem runs in your family.

One of the best ways to ensure better health as a senior is to learn about the risks of having a stroke. Knowing these risks will help you take the appropriate measures to keep yourself and any other seniors in your life safer.

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May 11, 2020

How to Help Seniors Struggling with Eating Disorders

Filed under: Meal Planning,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 9:37 am

By Brooke Chaplan

As people get older, they sometimes develop eating problems based on various medical conditions. Certain medicines can cause people to eat more or less than they should. Health problems with lethargy and dementia, for example, might cause seniors to miss meals or not be able to maintain adequate nutrition. Here are some ways you can help older individuals eat better.

Eating Disorders in SeniorsServe Favorites

Most people enjoy a few favorite foods. For some, it might be creamed spinach, and for others, roast chicken. Give the senior a choice of several favorites, and be sure to include nutritious foods or a healthy option. Check with the person or his or her doctor to find out which foods are recommended for someone in the elder’s condition. Even if a favorite is not that healthy, offer it now and then as part of a balanced meal.

Offer Healthy Snacks

Although some seniors do not always eat healthy meals, they sometimes enjoy nutritious snacks, depending on their general physical and dental health. Fresh fruits and veggies with yogurt dip, walnuts or cashews, cheese or peanut butter with whole wheat crackers, and low-fat ice cream may be enjoyable treats that will help to supplement an eating pattern that is not as nutritious or complete as it should be.

Reorganize Dining Times

Seniors’ eating schedules can occasionally get off kilter due to restless sleep, a medical issue, or bathroom issues. If possible, rearrange their dining plan so they can eat the main meal at lunch, for example, or have dinner a little earlier or later than usual. Adjusting meal times can make it easier for seniors to eat when they’re hungry rather than when food is placed before them.

Consult a Professional

Some seniors develop serious eating problems that can lead to a drastic weight change and may even harm their health. When the situation seems to escalate beyond normal, contact the person’s doctor for advice. You might also consult an expert nutritionist about treatment options for eating disorders for an elderly person. Sometimes it becomes necessary to make minor changes to the person’s habits or schedule, and a professional may be able to offer suggestions that will help.

Good nutrition is important for everyone, and especially for older people whose health may be impacted by serious medical conditions or deteriorating immunity. Try tips like these to support a senior’s need for nutrition or contact a professional who can help.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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May 7, 2020

Finding a Senior Community That Can Support You Through Difficult Times

Filed under: Senior Housing — seniorlivingguide @ 10:41 am

Finding Senior Housing

Courtesy of Anita Ginsburg

Being part of a community is not only a valuable part of everyday life, but it can often play an essential role in health and security. When looking to join a senior community for support of this type, here are a few services and features to ask about.

Companionship
Many senior centers provide common areas where members can connect with each other for a variety of reasons. Some just want to have casual conversations during the day while others are eager to have their meals with other members or share special holiday events and community celebrations. Rather than living at home alone, a senior living center is a great way to enjoy the company of others when you wish. Most centers offer shared areas in the facility, like a television room or a meeting room for programs and events.

Social Activities
Many older people are hesitant to do things in public alone. From riding the bus to going shopping, they feel safer and find it more enjoyable to be part of a group. Senior communities typically offer many kinds of social options that include playing board games in the commons area to taking a day trip to a local attraction. Going out to eat or enjoying an afternoon at the park can be shared in pairs or groups that provide social interaction and security. Look for a center that offers activities like this for leisure and relaxation as well as having fun.

Mutual Support
Some community centers provide group transportation or a driver for individual needs, such as going to the doctor or picking up a prescription. This is especially helpful for people who don’t have family members living close by to help. Services like hair styling, nail care, and podiatry are available in some senior communities along with auxiliary services that may be difficult for an older person to access alone. Going with a friend or as part of a group for necessary errands can make the activity a little safer and more enjoyable.

Security
Being around other people is especially helpful for seniors who may have special health conditions or a disability. Some are taking medications that may cause them to feel dizzy unexpectedly at times. Others may notice when this happens and can call for help if needed. Managerial monitoring also provides oversight to elders who need it.

If you or a senior you know is going through a tough time, look for a senior community that can provide the services you need to make life more secure and enjoyable.

Bio: Anita is a freelance writer from Denver, CO. She studied at Colorado State University, and now writes articles about health, business, family and finance. A mother of two, she enjoys traveling with her family whenever she isn’t writing. You can follow her on Twitter @anitaginsburg.

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April 29, 2020

More Ideas Keeping Your Residents Engaged and Happy While Maintaining Social Distancing.

Filed under: Caregivers,Retirement Community,Senior Activities,Senior Housing,Uncategorized — seniorlivingguide @ 11:33 am

Senior Housing NewsWe can safely say we are in a holding pattern for several more weeks.

Keeping that in mind, you may find yourself in a constant state of working hard to keep things fresh within your communities.

It is now more important than ever to have a plan to engage, entertain and keep your residents and your staff active daily.

Please don’t forget to include the staff, it is more important than ever to keep them motivated and happy on the job.

Setting up a weekly schedule of themes, decorations, activities and engagement will make a difference.

Once again, your SeniorLivingGuide.com team have drafted a few more ideas to share with your Program Directors, Marketers and Admin staff. Get everyone involved. This can really be a fun time!

  1. Play Dear Abby & Dear Arnold – Get some poster Boards and Big Markers – Pick a Topic, (such as – How do you not get gray hair?  What’s the best way to lose weight? Best place to Honeymoon and why?  Best advice your mama gave. ) Take pics of residents holding signs with their advice – make a video of all their advice.  Send out on Social Media – email to families.
  1. Cook Off – Each Resident submits their favorite recipe (dessert/salad/veggie/main course) for the Chef to pick from–Or your Chef gets creative and puts out a list to be voted on by the residents for something fun at Lunch every Friday. Everyone votes and the Chef makes. Will help bring diversity to the menu and residents love food.
  1. Elf on the Shelf re-appears – Who says the elf has to be good all year, dig him out of the Christmas box and let him get into mischief. The night shift is responsible for his next naughty move. Residents will love looking for him each day when they go for a walk.
  1. Decorate your Door Day – Have your residents get creative – Wrapping Paper, Tin Foil, Pictures or Drawings – Use Butcher Plain Paper and let residents and staff write little notes to each other on the doors.
  1. Poker Run- 5 Card Stud – (make sure you know how many rooms/people are playing and how many decks you will need) At Breakfast Everyone gets their first card, Mid-morning a second card is dealt to each resident, Lunch a third, Mid-day a forth and Dinner the fifth card. Top four hands win prizes. If you do not want to spread it out over the day, it can be a hallway activity. (use a unique decorated back deck that no one has, here are some on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07YFCH1QM/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_ZPEHEbEYBF7QJ ).
  1. If you allow Pets – Resident/Pet of the Week – Have residents submit picture and story – let others vote to elect a community “pet of the week” – Get a cute little toy for the Pet of the Week – Post Pics of pet and owner on Social Media with their story and share with others to post.
  1. Patio Play – With an amplifier or intercom system – Do Patio/Balcony Games – Simon Says is always a fun one, the fall back is Bingo but when you start thinking you can get creative. Have a Balcony/Patio Dance. – Check out what The Talbot on Granby did. https://www.facebook.com/TalbotOnGranby/videos/236927574117784/
  1. Shooting Range – Outside Time, set up tables (6 ft. apart) a bucket of water and some targets or empty water bottles as targets. Squirt gun competition – who doesn’t love a good squirt gun, always a party favorite.
  1. Window Paint day – Using the individual small trays of water color and a paint brush (38 sets for $39 on Amazon – Bulk Water Color Paint Party Pack)- Let Residents Paint their window. You can also set up one special window and tape it off to do the Stained Glass Window we have seen on Social Media.
  2. Show Horses – Its time to have a horse show- decorate brooms – get several employees to participate. Set up a silly obstacle course outside the building that is viewable from room windows. – Have the participating Staff ride the halls on their decorated brooms before the show. Outside have each Horseman weave in and out of lawn chairs, have little signs here and there “stop” “hop 3 times” “spin right spin to the left” “stop and tip your hat” get creative throw in some dance moves. Make it so everyone can enjoy from their window and cheer as the riders go by waving to the residents being silly and fun.

Last but Not Least – “Let’s Dance” – Your Staff need to enjoy the day as well, having your lunch servers break into a simple line dance or skit keeps things light and fun (don’t forget to get the video and post on Social Media)

If you do any of the activities that our SeniorLivingGuide.com staff has recommended, please share pictures or video with us by emailing to: dmahoney@seniorlivingguide.com. We would be happy to share your community’s story via social. We will tag your community if you so wish! Our social accounts can be a positive marketing extension of your brand during the Covid-19 pandemic. #weareallinthistogether

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April 20, 2020

How to Help Seniors Move to Their Assisted Living Community

Filed under: Assisted Living — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 8:17 am

By Brooke Chaplan

Moving your senior relative into an assisted living community is a huge decision, but it can help them to maintain their independence while receiving the care they need. However, your senior may need help choosing and moving into their new apartment. Use the following tips to help your senior loved one move into their assisted living community.

Research the Community

The first thing you want to do is research the community to ensure it is right for your senior. Use the website and reviews to learn everything you can about the community. You also want to schedule a tour of the entire community to get an idea of what it is like for residents.

moving into an ALFTour the Apartment

Most assisted living communities offer studio or bedroom apartments for seniors. Once you schedule a tour of the community, be sure to check out the vacant units to ensure they are safe and comfortable for your loved one. You may find it is a good decision to move your senior into this community, and your senior may be excited to move into their new place.

Hire A Moving Company

You also want to hire a moving company to help move your senior into their new apartment. There are plenty of companies that offer local and long distance movers. When you hire a moving company for your senior, you can rest assured that their items are insured. Their items are also in the hands of responsible movers who know the proper techniques for packing, loading and unloading boxes.

Help Your Senior Downsize

If your senior is moving from a home to an apartment, they may need help downsizing their items. Use this time to help your senior go through their items to determine what they are keeping, donating and discarding. If there are items they want to keep but do not have space for right now, you can always store them in your home or a storage unit.

Help Them Get Settled

Once your senior is moved into their new unit, make several visits to help them unpack their items. If you have moved in the past, you know that unpacking is just as tiring as packing. Your senior could use an extra set of hands to help them unpack, and you can spend more time with your loved one.

Your senior is going to need assistance from their family and movers when moving into an assisted living community. The best part is you can help them move on to a new chapter of their life.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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April 6, 2020

In the Senior Housing industry and hiring? We want to help you spread the word!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 2:50 pm

Senior Housing Employment Listings

These are trying times and we want to help in any way we can. Send us your job openings and we’ll help get the word out!

We will Eblast them to our data base of Industry Professionals.

We will Post them on our 13k+ Social Media followers on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

Let us Help!

This offer is for everyone in the industry serving seniors.

Send to: Nbirckbichler@SeniorLivingGuide.comNanette Birckbichler

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March 26, 2020

10 Ideas, Tips and Tricks Keeping Your Residents Engaged and Happy While Maintaining Social Distancing.

Filed under: Caregivers,Senior Activities,Senior Housing — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 2:59 pm

Senior Housing News

By Karen Cassidy

I shake my head when I see that we are using the words “community” “distance” and “social” in one sentence.

This is our new reality, at least for the time being, and it is important to keep seniors engaged and active. One of the biggest challenges is to make sure that we are doing our best to make sure that this crisis does not affect them emotionally as well.

We all know about FaceTime, Skype and other video visits with family, which are imperative. Maybe you are even doing visits through a glass window. Putting aside the family visits through electronics and glass windows, are you able to get creative with games, fun, laughter and interaction in the other times with so much on your plate?

Are you sharing the fun times and activities that you are having on your social media?

Social Media allows you to connect and share your most authentic community experience with your families and future residents.

We know that marketing right now is hard to do the traditional way. In this ever changing environment, we are forced to learn new ways to effectively engage with our audience.

These caregivers and family members are checking out your social media to see what you are doing now. If you are not sharing, are you shortchanging them?

Sharing on your Social media through images, video, and stories will not only connect your current residents’ family with their loved ones, but it will work to benefit your community in the future. Future residents will look at your social media and how you dealt with this pandemic and the activities that took place in your community as part of their decision.

Make it work for you in the future.  Our future families will be asking us about how we handled this time.

Do not forget that while we are in very strange days, marketing your community does not stop. How you market just changes.

We have loved seeing all the different ideas from all over the country shared on Social Media, our Team at SeniorLivingGuide.com has a few ideas of our own that we will be sharing with you. We hope that these are great ideas to help get your creative juices flowing and help provide quality content for your social while making happy, healthy, smiling residents!

Ideas or happy, healthy, and smiling Residents and Staff!

    1. Joke of the Day – When staff clock in, have a clipboard on the wall with Corny/Cheesy jokes – each member of the staff picks a joke a day and crosses it off the list and as they go through their day they share their corny joke of the day with everyone they meet.  (check out https://www.quickfunnyjokes.com/cheesy.html)
    2. Staff Dress Up Days – fun and whimsical for everyone (Residents can vote for their favorite Staff Member “Dress Up”)
    3. Hat Day for Residents – everyone can decorate their hat/crown – a member of staff goes around and snaps pictures – if you have a closed channel on TV post the pictures here for everyone to enjoy – post to social media (Amazon – Crowns 40 for $15 or Gangsta hats 24 for $15)
    4. Mustache Day – staff and/or residents wears a stick on mustache (amazon pkgs of 60 are 8.99) – take more pics and social media them. Print up a collage and share with residents.
    5. Resident Newsletter – If you do not have a Resident Newsletter now is the time to start one. Let the residents share pictures, recipes, stories and other items of interest in a weekly 2-3 page newsletter.
    6. Balloons – Anything you do with balloons is always fun until they pop. Plastic Fly Swatters from the Dollar Tree and some Balloons make a nice Mock Tennis game and you can maintain social distance – clear a spot in the dining room for a fun game or two. Do you have a helium tank? Do a four-five balloon bouquet and take to each resident’s room. Just having balloons make everyone happy.
    7. Storyteller… Do you have residents that are great storytellers? Readers? Put them on the intercom let them read a little story, tell a little tale. Set up a sign in sheet for those that want to participate or they can tell a joke.
    8. 6pm News Broadcast – Have residents put together the weather report for the next day, highlights of daily news inside the community and around the world. Could make it only good news “news” and put them on the intercom or closed circuit TV.
    9. Mystery Pen Pals – Program Director takes the names of those that want to participate – assign each person a “Game Name” i.e.: Doris Johnson – Game Name is Winnie the Pooh. (use Disney names/star Trek/or old rockers like Elvis) Winnie the Pooh goes into the hat – each person picks a mystery name to write to. Therefore, Winnie the Pooh may pick Donald Duck out of the hat. They cannot share their real name. At the end of the week if you have a close-knit community they can try to guess who they were pen paling with or you can post a page with pictures and their mystery name and real name.
    10. Outside Fly Time – When residents go outside to enjoy the sunshine have some balsa wood airplanes available – throwing them and retrieving them is great exercise and a lot of fun. (I love amazon – 36 Balsa-Wood Top Gun Glider Model Planes for $44 and you can spray with alcohol to sanitize)

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