March 13, 2019

Tips for Helping Your Aging Parent Move into Their Senior Living Home

Filed under: Assisted Living,Downsizing,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:38 am

helping aging parent move

Courtesy of Elise Morgan

Moving your parents into an assisted living home is almost never going to be an easy process, and although there are many benefits to the transition, it’s inevitable that some aspects of the change will in one way or another upset them. Oftentimes, when being moved into a senior living home, parents may feel abandoned and believe that they are losing part of their identity.

Instead of having your parents feel as though they are ending the life they have always known, ensure them that they are moving into a new chapter of their lives and make the transition as smooth as possible with the following tips.

  1. Encourage Your Parents to Participate in Community Activities

Make the transition smooth and mitigate second-guesses from your parents by introducing them to the community and encourage them to participate in the home’smoving parent to senior home activities. This should be done both before the big move and after – helping your parents make friends and get to know their way around the community.

Assisted living communities have plenty of activities for your parents to participate in, and while not all may appeal to them, some may really grab your loved ones’ attention. When residents feel as if they have a place among the community, it is bound to help their outlook on the transition and even has the possibility of making the move a little bit easier.

  1. Make it Feel Like Home

This is where they will be living from now on, so make it feel like home. Not all assisted living homes have the idea of coziness in mind when designing the rooms, so be sure to bring over any items that can help with this. Some starter ideas to vamp up their new room for comfort is to sprinkle in family pictures and to add color to the walls with new paint or to the floor with a lovely rug. To maximize their bedroom for ultimate comfort, consider bringing in their old bed that they trust, or a new one that they will love instead of the typical assisted living mattress that is not typically designed for comfort. When you prioritize their home living space, your parents will start to recognize this as their new home in no time.

  1. Show Your Parents That They Did Not Lose Their Independence

It’s hard to not feel protective over your parents as they switch to a new home, but don’t feel that you need to be with them at all times during the move. In fact, this can actually hurt their progress, as excessive ‘handholding’ could inhibit your parent from successfully adjusting to their new home. Let your parents feel as if they still have control over their own life, and let them choose their own schedule, their own friends, and other decisions that are most important to them.

  1. Prepare Yourself for Bad Days

This transition is usually not going to be a walk in the park, so prepare yourself for your parents not taking to their new home immediately. You may experience some negative comments here and there, but remember that this is an important time in their lives and that this change is only to benefit them – not hurt them. Instead of taking these negative comments or feelings personally, document them and see them as an opportunity for places of improvement to their lifestyle down the road.

Just like any transition, it will take time to integrate your parents into their new home, but stay positive and know that this way they will lead a healthier and safer lifestyle.

  1. Remember – It Will Get Easier

Even though moving your parents into their assisted living home is difficult right now, know that it will not always be this way. Soon enough, your parents will start to get used to their new lifestyle, and the more that they are involved in the community and activities, the more likely it is that they actually begin to really love it. At the end of the day, remember that you made the right choice for this situation and that you did your best during this difficult time in everyone’s lives.

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March 4, 2019

Seniors in the City: 4 Ways to Prevent a Slip-and-Fall Injury

Filed under: Senior Safety — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:50 am

Seniors Fall Safety

Courtesy of Lizzie Weakley

For seniors, even a minor fall can have lasting consequences on mobility and comfort. Older adults typically have weaker bones, joints, and ligaments, which are more easily broken or strained from slip-and-fall incidents. It’s impossible to completely remove all the risks from daily life in the city, but there are a few effective strategies seniors can use to mitigate common hazards.

Stretch and Exercise Regularly

Senior citizens may not feel quite as energetic as they did in their youth, but even older adults can improve their health and reduce the risk of accidents by staying in shape. It’s a good idea to talk to a doctor and fitness specialist to find a safe routine for your current physical condition. A little bit of aerobic and strength-building exercise can make a lot of daily activities much easier.

Take Your Time and Ask for Help

It’s natural to desire independence and not rely on others for help, but this attitude can come at a high cost. Seniors shouldn’t hesitate to ask for assistance when appropriate, especially when disembarking vehicles, using stairs, or navigating uneven terrain. Rushing is also a sure-fire way to slip and fall, so take your time even if it means being a few minutes late.

Try Shoes with Traction

There are plenty of footwear options specifically designed for the needs of older adults. Getting walking shoes with a solid grip can make all the difference when it comes to preventing needless injury. Seniors also need to ensure their footwear fits properly to avoid complications with foot and ankle health.

Always Check the Ground

A confident, forward-looking stride is a good general practice, but it’s also wise to keep an eye on the ground, as well. Wet or icy surfaces are among the most hazardous for seniors, especially those with diminished balance from age-related issues. It’s usually best to avoid sidewalk and pavement that hasn’t been treated for snow or ice. Don’t hesitate to ask for help if going around treacherous terrain isn’t an option.

Seniors that stay in shape and tread carefully still run a risk of a serious slip-and-fall accident when they travel the city. Even if there’s something they could have done differently, the fault isn’t necessarily theirs. In cases where a property or business owner may be liable for the accident, some seniors turn to a lawsuit settlement funding company to access financial resources they need to press a compensation claim.

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March 1, 2019

Stay In the Senior Know – Get Helpful Info Just For Seniors Straight To Your Inbox!

Filed under: SeniorLivingGuide.com — seniorlivingguide @ 10:25 am

seniors online

You’ve heard the term, Knowledge Is Power?

Stay up to date with current and pertinent information just for Seniors.

Sign up today to receive our helpful blogs in your inbox weekly focusing on successful aging intended to keep you informed in detail making your lives more exciting, healthy, and productive with topics such as:

• 10 Ways to Save on Healthcare
• How to Get Your Best Sleep
• Short Version of Veterans Aid and Attendance
• Navigating Flu Season for Seniors
• De-clutter Now!
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• And much, much more!

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February 15, 2019

Age Keeping You from Your Hobbies? 4 Leisurely Alternatives to Fill the Void

Filed under: Aging,Memory Care,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 1:34 pm

Courtesy of Lizzie Weakley

Often, aging individuals can find it challenging to maintain their hobbies they once enjoyed. This can often leave an empty space in their lives that they aren’t exactly sure how to fill. Sometimes, it can even lead to social withdrawal or a sedentary lifestyle. Therefore, it is important to stay active and engaged in activities you love as you get older. While you may not be able to participate in rigorous physical activities that you enjoyed when you were younger, there are still many fun and leisurely hobbies you can take up. The following information provides some helpful tips about pastimes you can begin at almost any age: 

Puzzles and Board Games
Puzzles and games are a great way to keep your memory sharp. Many people believe that they can even help to improve your cognitive abilities and prevent memory loss. Therefore, these make great activities for the elderly. Planning a game night with your friends and family is also a great way to engage with others and become more social. Planning a game night can be relatively simple. To start off, you should research some of the most popular games that your guests are likely to enjoy and then purchase a few. You can also prepare snacks or a nice dinner to make your guests feel right at home. 

Arts and Crafts 
Arts and crafts are also another great option that can be taken up at nearly any age. If you are a creative person and enjoy making things, this could be something you can explore. You can learn how to paint, draw, sculpt, or take up photography. You can also make your own DIY projects and crafts, such as wreaths, flower arrangements, jewelry, pressed flowers, scrapbooks, and birdhouses. 

Sewing 
In addition, if you are interested in sewing, there are many options to pursue, such as knitting and crocheting. You can knit blankets, scarves, or socks and even take up quilting. If you are interested in making your own clothing, this can also be a great way to pass the time. There are so many options when it comes to sewing, and learning these new skills can help you to make things for yourself or even gifts for your friends and family that they can appreciate for many years to come! 

Coin Collecting 
Coin collecting can be a very rewarding and engaging activity. It can allow you to potentially make money in the future if you are able to hold onto your coins while they increase in value. Not only this, but collecting coins helps you to gain a deeper appreciation for history and culture. If it is something that interests you, you may want to visit some of your local silver coin shops to learn more about the hobby. 

Overall, you shouldn’t let aging hold you back from finding new activities that you enjoy. Hobbies can help to bring a lot of fulfillment into your life and they can make a great way to pass the time on slow and boring days. You just need to find what you enjoy and turn it into a hobby or skill that you can develop!

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February 5, 2019

Bored with Retirement? 4 Ways to Make Your Golden Years Grand

Filed under: Boomer,Downsizing,Retirement Planning,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 11:48 am

Courtesy of Lizzie Weakley

Every year marks a fundamental life change for tens of thousands of people in the United States: the transition from work to retirement. Many people look forward to the moment when they can step away from their job, but some also experience strong feelings of uncertainty about their newfound lack of direction. Whether you are about to retire or already have been for years, there are a few simple ways that help you get the most out of the experience. retirement

Try New Things

It’s easy for adults to fall back on the familiar and stick to old habits, especially immediately following retirement. However, forcing yourself to explore new things can open up opportunities and make the golden years a lot more colorful. Taking art lessons, learning to cook new foods, and meeting new people are just a few ways to bring a breath of fresh air into daily life.

Mobile Living and Travel Lifestyle

Mobile and RV lifestyle isn’t a good fit for everyone, but modern vehicles often sport a number of amenities and conveniences that rival any home. Motor and mobile homes can make travel much more affordable and provides greater control over schedule, pacing, and itinerary. Many state and national parks have dedicated space for people using living vehicles, so there are plenty of interesting sites that accommodate this lifestyle.

Consider Moving to a New House

Many people working towards retirement look forward to spending more time with their family members. Checking out homes for sale near close friends and family can create an opportunity to downsize to a more efficient house and cut down on travel time. Other retirees take advantage of their freedom to find a home in an area that has a better climate, more active community, or other desirable features. Moving shouldn’t be a snap decision, but there can be lot of long-term benefits for those willing to consider a big life change.

Stay Active and Involved

Many older adults find themselves lacking stimulation or excitement in their daily life, which can eventually lead to depression or social withdrawal. There are dozens of different ways for retirees to stay active and involved with people in their community. Retirees with specialized skills can also consider getting a part-time job or consulting on as-needed basis to maintain their professional skills.

People have varying opinions and perspectives about the prospect of retirement, ranging from excitement to dread. However, these years can be among the richest and most rewarding of your entire life if you are willing to take a step into the unknown.

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January 29, 2019

Restlessness When Living with Dementia

Filed under: Alzheimer's,Dementia,Seniors Health — Tags: , , , — seniorlivingguide @ 1:18 pm

For someone living with dementia, restlessness and fidgeting are common behaviours which have long been associated with agitation or stress.  Together with fidget widget for seniorsDementia Advisor for Alzheimer’s Society Judith Bower and UCLan Senior Graphic Design Lecturer Jane Souyave, Active Minds have been working towards creating an activity to help alleviate fidgeting and repetitive movements.

Conversing with carers of people living with dementia, the teams realised that these restless and repetitive motions were not always negative and wanted to dispel the thoughts that fidgeting is a disruptive behaviour.

Funding from the Alzheimer’s Society and UCLan’s Innovation funds have allowed the teams to work together and raise awareness surrounding communications and connection techniques for people living with advanced dementia. The ‘Positive Connections’ group was formed and worked tirelessly to come up with a concept which would later advance in to a product – the Fidget Widget.

What Is Fidget Widget

An age-appropriate activity, Fidget Widget comprises of five different handheld tactile tools which have been specially designed to help keep hands both relaxed and busy. The different tools can be interacted with in a variety of creative ways such as spinning, sliding, twisting, turning or rolling.

The variety of actions have been shown to not only keep restless hands busy, but also improve dexterity and provide stimulation and engagement as the activity is both meaningful and fun.

Fidget Widget is not just an individual activity however, it has been shown to be beneficial in both group and singular settings and is a brilliant way to get carers involved.

The Fidget Widget tools have undergone a two year testing period whereby the families of people living with dementia were supported with communication techniques using the Toolkit. The incredible feedback from the families showed the positive effect these products have had for their loved ones.

Interacting with the Fidget Widget has been shown to help enhance a persons psychological wellbeing as it provides an outlet for restless hands whilst being a meaningful and engaging activity. The creation of this product has allowed a wider understanding of restless behaviours and the ways in which we can interact with people living with dementia who may have verbal communication difficulties.

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January 25, 2019

Are you doing these 10 things to save on healthcare?

Filed under: Health Insurance,Healthcare,Medicaid,Medicare,Seniors Health — Tags: , , — seniorlivingguide @ 2:49 pm

Courtesy of Alison Lee

When you’re a retired senior, you finally get to pursue your “real” life. Long vacations, cruises, new hobbies, and other adventures await. However, old age also brings more illnesses, and sometimes it can be a challenge to balance your ideal post-retirement life with your healthcare costs. Make sure you’re doing these 10 things to minimize your healthcare spending.

healthcare saving for seniors

  1. Take advantage of preventive care.

The earlier you spot a disease, the easier and cheaper it is to fix – plus, you’ll feel better sooner. Medicare covers a bounty of preventive and screening services, from cardiovascular disease screening to depression screening. If you’ve been under Medicare Part B for more than 12 months, you’re also entitled to a “wellness” visit every year.

To make the most of your visit, make a list of health questions and concerns throughout the year to take to your wellness check-up so you don’t forget. Being thorough and honest about your habits (such as whether you smoke or drink alcohol), medical history, and family health history can help your doctor catch risk factors early.

  1. Buy generic medications and buy them online from more affordable sources.

You can save a significant amount of money by choosing generic drugs over brand-name ones. Generic and brand-name drugs are deemed “bioequivalent” by the FDA, so there is virtually no loss in quality.

Many Americans also buy prescription drugs online from international and Canadian pharmacies, such as Canadian pharmacy referral service Rx Connected. Pharmaceutical industries in other countries may be more strictly regulated than in the U.S., making their drugs significantly cheaper.

Buying drugs online may sound risky, but there are many legitimate websites that care about drug safety and patient wellbeing. However, do exercise caution when buying anything online. If a price is too good to be true, or if the company claims you don’t need a prescription for something that should, it’s likely a scam. Legitimate websites like Rx Connected will welcome consumer questions and concerns, and even encourages doctors to call them directly.

  1. Get vaccinated.

Make sure you get vaccinated during flu season; it’s often free for seniors under Medicare. The flu bug changes every year, so it’s important to get a flu shot each year. Seasonal influenza isn’t just a nuisance; it’s highly contagious and especially dangerous for seniors. Complications can be serious. Click here for more information about the flu.

You should also ensure you are vaccinated against other contagious diseases. Talk to your doctor about what vaccines to get, including booster shots. Getting vaccinated is not just good for you; you can help protect immunocompromised and high-risk individuals too.

  1. Learn about Medicare Savings Programs and Extra Help, and see if you qualify.

If you haven’t already, research Medicare Savings Programs and Extra Help, programs that help those enrolled in Medicare pay their premiums. You may still qualify for Medicare Savings Programs if your income is higher than the limits. If you’re eligible for the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary Program, Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary Program, or Qualifying Individual Program, you are automatically eligible for Extra Help for prescription drugs.

  1. Visit a Community Health Center.

Community Health Centers are available in all 50 states, Washington D.C., and every American territory. These state-funded clinics offer free or low-cost care regardless of a patient’s ability to pay or their insurance status, and are located in designated “medically undeserved areas.” Services may include preventive care, mental healthcare, pharmacy services, dental care, and more. You can find one near you by clicking here.

  1. Learn about health.

Now that you’re retired, you have time to read all those books on your backburner book list! Why not also read more about health in general? The good news is, a large amount of useful health information is free and found on the internet. Being informed can alert you to potential problems early.

Of course, there is an unfortunate amount of misinformation on the internet. Stay away from articles with sensationalized titles like “Lose 10 Pounds in 1 Week!” Stick to government-approved websites like the CDC, Medline Plus, and the National Institutes of Health.

However, DO NOT diagnose yourself based on information you read on the internet. There’s a reason why physicians go through years of schooling. When in doubt, see a doctor.

  1. Now that you know more about health, get the appropriate level of help.

Not every little discomfort warrants a trip to the ER. If you have a minor health issue or question, see if you can find a 24/7 phone line where you can talk to a nurse. Many insurance plans offer this service, as do many hospitals. A qualified nurse can decide whether your health question warrants a trip to the doctor’s office. Online services – where you talk to a doctor remotely over the internet – are another low-cost option for more minor health problems.

  1. Compare before you buy.

Just like buying a new car, you should shop around before committing to a health service. Ask your healthcare provider about the Healthcare Bluebook, a good tool to use to compare pricing for health services offered by different providers. Don’t pay for a hundred-dollar X-ray when there’s one at half the price just a block away!

  1. Does your local community center, senior center, or non-profit advocacy group offer discounted or free programs?

If you have a chronic illness like arthritis or diabetes, a non-profit advocacy group may have a facility near you that offers programs to help manage your condition. If you do not have a chronic illness, check out what your local community and senior center offers. Don’t restrict yourself to fitness programs; your physical and mental health can benefit greatly from art therapy, music lessons, and more.

  1. Continue living a healthy lifestyle.

The best way to save on healthcare is to not get sick in the first place. Now that you’re retired, invest some time into making healthful, home-cooked meals, spend an hour or two at the park each day, and make sure you’re active and socializing regularly. If you smoke, now is a good time to quit, and while a glass of wine or two is fine on occasion, if you drink excessively, now is also a time to cut down.

Ask any physician and they will say that good health is really quite simple: eat well, move around, get enough rest, and be happy. So go ahead and enjoy retirement.

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January 22, 2019

How to Get Your Best Sleep in Your Senior Years

Filed under: Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: , , — seniorlivingguide @ 2:21 pm

Courtesy of Lisa Smalls

Elderly people in our world deserve the best in their golden years, including the best sleep. Unfortunately, it gets harder to sleep well as we age. Seniors are more likely to struggle falling asleep, staying sleep and sleeping deeply enough—they also suffer from age-specific sleep problems—than any other age group.

Seniors, you are not destined for poor sleep. We will explain how to attack your sleep issues and come out the other end rested and refreshed for another day on earth.

Sleep Issues

The good news for senior citizens here is that most sleep issues the elderly might face can normally be tracked back to physical (soreness, osteoporosis, arthritis, restless leg syndrome, insomnia) and psychiatric illnesses (depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s disease) and the medications doctors use to treat them.

Thankfully we’re not usually talking about issues that do require medication to alleviate.  But our older friends should discuss their sleep issues with doctors and family members to address them.

better sleep for seniorsAlso, did you know our sleep patterns change as get older? Our internal clock, which tells us when to rest and when to wake up, actually shifts as we age. Seniors tend to want to go to sleep earlier and wake up earlier.

But our need for sleep, once we reach adulthood, does not change. Popular belief is misinformed. How much sleep we actually need to heal and feel fully restored each morning does not decrease with age. All adults—defined as anyone age 18 or over—need 7-9 hours per night.

Sleep culprits

And we’re all human. We have habits that hinder our sleep.

One sleep thief is the food we eat or drinks we imbibe. Eating too close to bedtime means our bodies are still working to digest as we’re trying to wind down for the day. Drinking alcohol may relax your inhibitions, but it doesn’t ease you to sleep.

Sleeping in a room that is too warm will keep you up. Seniors do get colder because often they don’t move enough to keep the blood circulating. But sleep scientists recommend sleeping in a room cooler than 70 degrees. Your body temperature will regulate to a good temperature once it begins the hard work of repairing itself as we sleep.

Sleeping in a room with too much light definitely robs you of good sleep. The artificial blue light behind our smartphones, tablets and televisions is the worst offender. The light artificially signals your brain that it must stay awake. You must keep those devices in other rooms at bedtime, ideally starting two hours before bedtime.

Ironically not getting enough natural sunlight during the day also slows the process of falling asleep. Seniors may not be mobile enough to go outside. It may be dangerous for them to do so without help, or they may not feel safe enough to do it where they live. Without at least two hours of natural sunlight per day, your circadian rhythm gets confused. You end up not feeling ready for bed once it’s time.

Another problem related to mobility is that seniors may not get enough exercise each day. Whatever you can do to get your heart pumping, based on your physical ability, will burn fuel. Burning off some during the day, eases you to sleep at night.

Finally, the wrong mattress or a too-old mattress will definitely keep you up at night. You toss and turn because your body isn’t comfortable. Any mattress that throws your spine out of alignment or puts too much pressure on delicate joints and muscles needs to be replaced.

Tools for better sleep

It starts with the best mattress, that you can afford, that works for you. Because there is a very competitive marketplace for mattresses these days, you have so many mattress options to choose from that will address whatever issues you have.

Younger adults usually do well with a medium-firm mattress. Medium-soft mattresses are better for seniors, who need a little more give, something more gentle to curve to older shoulders and hips. The important thing is that your spine remains aligned straight regardless of your sleep position.

For example, If you sleep on your back, that area of the mattress should not cave against your weight. That would put your tailbone and lumbar vertebrae out of alignment with the rest of your spine. If you are bothered by back pain, choose a mattress designed to alleviate it.

Now that you’re equipped with this knowledge, you’ll be on your way to better nights of sleep.

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January 16, 2019

Senior and Single? 4 Ways to Develop a Thriving Social Life

Courtesy of Lizzie Weakley

Being a single senior comes with its own unique challenges. Unfortunately, as you’ve gotten older, it has become more and more difficult to keep old friends and make new ones. Some friends move away and retire to warmer climates, while potential friends maybe aren’t looking to add to their social circle. But there are ways that you can develop a thriving social life. Below you will find four exciting ideas on how to expand your network of friends.

Volunteer
One way to expand your social network is to volunteer your time to worthy causes. Instead of sitting at home by yourself, you can go out and meet a lot of great people who share the same passions as you. For example, if you love animals, then think senior and singleabout volunteering at your local animal shelter. Not only will you get to pet and care for needy cats and dogs, but you will be able to make friends with other volunteers and the shelter staff.

Get Out There and Date
Yes, you’ve already been there and done that when it comes to dating, but dating as a senior is vastly different. For one, you already know what you want and who you get along with. And two, you don’t necessarily have to date in order to get married. Many seniors date in order keep their social life alive and active as well as to seek companionship. Going on a few dates can get you out of the house and back into the world. Try double dating with other couples by going to dinner, the movies, or to plays.

Join a Senior Travel Group
Another great way to increase your social life is to join a senior travel group. These kinds of groups will not only help you make new friends, but will help you see the world as well. Traveling with someone can also help you form tight bonds because of your shared experience. Also, if you are retired, there may be no better time than now to take long trips to countries you’ve already dreamed of visiting. You don’t have a boss to report to, so you can spend more time touring Europe or cruising the Baltic Sea.

Move to a Retirement Community
Lastly, moving to a retirement community can increase your social life tenfold. A good retirement community will allow you to participate in group activities, such as sports or cards, to eat meals with other in a clubhouse, and to go shopping with others. When moving, remember the best way to get the most money out of your house is to renovate, especially if you have old laminate benchtops or floors. You want to make sure you get all you can out of your house so that you have more to spend when buying an apartment or condo in a retirement community.

Remember, the only real way to develop your social life is to put yourself out there and meet people! Follow the above tips to strengthen your odds of finding lasting relationships.

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January 11, 2019

Preventing Falls and Senior Safety

Filed under: Senior Safety,Seniors Health — Tags: , , , — seniorlivingguide @ 2:16 pm

By: Darleen Mahoney

A few simple precautions can help make your home or senior living community safe for you or your senior from dangerous falls.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the number one cause of injuries among Seniors. A person living with a cognitive impairment Grabcessoriessuch as dementia or Alzheimer’s is two to three times more likely to experience a fall with serious injury than their cognitively intact counterparts. Injuries from falls in seniors are more detrimental as they may result in a more serious injury or even death. These more serious injuries can include hip fractures, cuts, serious head and brain injuries. Even when there is no serious injury, a fall can be very scary for a senior and cause them to avoid activities out of fear of falling.

Due to the high risk of falls associated with this population, creating a safe home environment and living space is extremely critical.

You can make your home safe from falls with a few basic changes. It does not have to be a complete house remodel; a few simple tweaks can make a big impact.

The bathroom can be one of the most dangerous rooms in a home. Falls often occur when getting in and out of the tub or shower. Grab bars are an essential part of any Senior’s bathroom. Grab bars reduce the risk of slipping and falling. Grab bars are inexpensive and simple to install. If you have concerns about the appearance of installing grab bars in your home and want to maintain a certain aesthetic appeal, Grabcessories.com offers beautiful safety grab bars that blend right in to your living space. Their products completely blend into a bathroom design while providing a safe environment. They offer 2-in-1 Fall prevention systems disguising grab bars as bath accessories. These fall prevention accessories are not only available for homes but cater to senior living communities as well.

Other important tips to make the rest of a home or assisted living community safer is:

• Removing any tripping hazards – fix any loose carpet, throw away rugs, remove furniture that may block or make maneuvering around a space more difficult.
• Clutter – A neat home free of clutter can help prevent a fall
• Lighting – Inadequate lighting, especially for seniors who may have poor eyesight or may be unsteady, can be detrimental to a senior living space
• Foot wear – While socks and slippers may be the most comfortable, its important to make sure that they are non-slip. If possible, encourage them to wear something with a rubber sole.
• Non-slip flooring – Add non-slip linings to tubs and showers

Falls among seniors are a serious problem and a bad fall can have a huge impact on an otherwise healthy and independent senior. The good news is that falls can be prevented. Following the simple guidelines and doing a little planning can significantly reduce the threat of a fall, giving you or your loved ones many more years of independent living.

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