July 19, 2019

How to Ask for Help in Your Golden Years

Filed under: Aging,Aging in Place,Home Health Care,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 3:49 pm

How to Ask for Help in Your Golden YearsBy Anica Oaks

You may have heard the saying, “Grow old gracefully,” but there are many changes that occur as you move beyond middle age and into your golden years. Your 60s, 70s and beyond will be filled with various psychological and physical changes and challenges. Asking for help can make you feel weak, but you aren’t. It’s a sign of strength and self-awareness to recognize when you can no longer do something on your own.

Understand How Age Changes Things

You were probably taught from an early age that it’s important to be independent. Asking for help can make us feel like we’ve failed somehow, and you may worry that you’ll look weak and be a burden to your loved ones.

Getting older comes with some inevitable changes, and it’s important to accept these facts rather than try to go against them. Your health may decline, or you might have to live with a health condition like arthritis. You may also be dealing with feelings of loneliness and isolation now that your children are grown. If you are widowed, then facing the rest of your life by yourself can trigger deep feelings of sadness that may turn into depression.

Recognize What You Need

Are you physically struggling to get around like you used to? Maybe going up the stairs is too painful or strenuous now. Perhaps you have emotional needs that aren’t being met, but you don’t want to bother people by calling them up just to talk.

Maybe you notice some health symptoms that weren’t there before; do you have frequent chest pains, feel dizzy or have become more forgetful than you used to be? It’s natural to want to ignore these things and write them off, but getting help early can make you happier and protect your well-being.

Finding the Right Resources

The last thing you may want to do is move into a care home, but they are not all like hospitals or filled with sick seniors. Instead, there are many retirement villages and facilities that offer round-the-clock assistance while still giving you plenty of space and independence.

For those who do not have any close family or friends they can reach out to, exploring elderly home care options can make you feel empowered and give you the help you need. Make sure that you are vocal about everything that’s bothering you; it’s possible for loneliness, sadness and even fear of the future to make us come off as cold and distant.

Don’t allow yourself to become closed off from the world. As you progress through the next stage of your life, be open to asking for help, receiving love and being in the presence of others as much as you can.

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July 2, 2019

4 Ways to Get Quick Cash as a Retiree

Filed under: Financial Planning,Retirement,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 1:06 pm

Quick Cash for SeniorsCourtesy of Lizzie Weakley

If you are now retired and no longer get your income from working a full-time job, there are several clever ways to make some extra cash when money is tight. Many of the best ways to earn a passive income don’t require a lot of strenuous mental or physical labor. Here are a few ideas for making some extra money as a retiree.

Attend Focus Groups

Taking part in focus groups merely involves giving your opinions on certain products, services or social issues. You might get the chance to try a new food product, give your opinions on the latest electronics, or even take part in a mock jury for an upcoming trial. Many of these focus groups will pay handsomely for just a small amount of your time (possibly as little as one hour). Payment often comes in the form of cash, a check or a gift card.

Work as a Sitter

Whether you want to babysit, housesit or pet sit, you can make money by acting as someone’s eyes and ears when they’re away to ensure that nothing bad happens. You’ll want to have references so that people who want to hire you can verify them to guarantee that you’re trustworthy. You can be a sitter as part of a one-time gig or sit more regularly on your own schedule. To find sitter jobs, there are websites for specific types of sitters that you can browse and join.

Sell Your Life Insurance Policy

You might be asking yourself, “Can I really sell my life insurance policy for cash?” the answer is yes if you meet certain eligibility criteria. Through a process known as life settlement, you can usually sell your policy if you are 70 years of age or older and your policy totals $100,000 or greater. A person who is under the age of 70 might be able to sell their policy if they’ve been diagnosed with a terminal illness. The policy types that can be sold include term life, whole life and universal life.

Sell Arts and Crafts Online

If you have a knack for creativity, you may be able to turn your skill into a money-making opportunity. You can sell any unique pieces of artwork or crafts that you make to customers online and watch the money come into your bank account. Selling items with holiday themes can be especially lucrative around holidays. There are several arts and crafts websites that you can join to start selling your goods.

Supplementing your income as a senior doesn’t have to involve a lot of backbreaking labor. By tapping into the right resources and putting your already-existing skills to work, you can make the money that you need in almost no time.

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June 10, 2019

Vacationing with an Elderly Parent: Options

Filed under: Aging,Senior Housing,Senior Travel,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 11:58 am

market streetAs a caregiver of an elderly parent, getting away is a must. But it can also be very difficult. It can be even more difficult if you don’t have a backup plan to help when you are away.

If you’ve decided to book a vacation that includes your elderly or cognitively impaired parent, make the most of it. You want to make great memories with your parent, but also want your vacation to be relaxing and memorable for yourself and your family. The answer is to plan very carefully and look at a few options.

You will need to plan and pack meticulously.

  • Make sure that you have medical clearance
  • Pack medication and any necessary paperwork
  • Make driving comfortable
  • Plan frequent breaks during travel and while vacationing
  • Relax and enjoy time together

For additional relaxation and downtime, you may want to consider hiring a caregiver to travel with you – which could be very costly. Another option would be to find a destination that provides secure vacation and temporary accommodations for your elderly or cognitively impaired parent.

Market Street at East Lake is in beautiful Tarpon Springs, Florida which is a vacation destination! Market Street at East Lake offers limited vacation stays in a resort-style setting with chef prepared meals, private label wine and fully furnished suites in an assisted living and memory care facility for your loved one.

While your loved one is in a safe and secure environment, you can enjoy the aspects of your vacation that you, as a caregiver, need in order to recharge and energize. If you choose a destination with a facility as accommodating as Market Street at East Lake in Tarpon Springs, you have the option to drop by and pick up your loved one for a pool day or dinner. It could be the perfect solution that you have been looking for.

Come and see what Market Street of East Lake has to offer your loved one.

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June 3, 2019

9 Ways for Seniors to Make Money Online Part-Time

Filed under: Boomer,Retirement Planning,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 9:08 am

Courtesy of Chloe Bennet, a career blogger at Assignment help Australia and Sociology help Australia, websites that provide resume and business writing help. Also, she teaches public speaking and online course creation at Paper Fellows portal.

9 Ways for Seniors to Make Money Online Part-Time

If you’re a senior looking for an online part-time job, you are not alone. Many seniors are looking for ways to make some extra money or even just to stay busy in retirement. The internet has created many opportunities for freelance work. Here are nine ways for seniors to make money online part-time.

Use your skills

One easy way for seniors to make money is by simply using the skills they employed while in the workforce. Only this time you get to be your own boss and work online on your own terms. Use the lessons you learned while you were an employee to build a successful online business. You can also use those same skills as a freelancer on sites such as Freelancer, Guru, and Snag Jobs.

Online tutor

If you have experience teaching or tutoring experience, then why not make some money tutoring online? Even if you don’t have that kind of experience, if you have an area of expertise then it’s worth giving it a try. Tutoring online is a great way to be social and meet some nice new people while you’re earning money. You can find work doing online tutoring at sites such as Essay Helper and Chemistry Writing.

Sales and marketing manager

There are tons of freelance opportunities for seniors who have experience selling products and managing clients. If you have communications experience and can adapt to the new digital and social media aspects of marketing, then this could be a great job for you. The best way for you to find this kind of work is through your own professional networks. Sell yourself, your experience, and how you can benefit your potential clients and you will find plenty of jobs.

Academic writer

Do you have an academic background? You can use your knowledge and experience to make money online as an academic writer. Make some good money and keep your mind extra sharp by writing paper and essays. You can look for academic writing jobs at places such as College Paper Writing Service and History Help.

Passive income

Passive income has a bit of a tarnished reputation and many people are skeptical about the idea. But there are many legitimate ways of creating passive income and you can start before you retire. There are companies where you can earn this money without needing to join anything or aggressively market to people. Be smart and find someone with a promising marketing tree and then try and position yourself at the top of it. As long as the company exists, your tree will grow and so will your passive income.

Accounting

If you were in accounting or tax consulting before retirement, that is something you can continue with on a freelance online basis. Keep your eyes open for people looking for tax help during the busy season. One segment to pay attention to is small business owners looking for someone to help them balance their books. These interactions can lead to further opportunities such as consulting for them on all kinds of financial subjects.

Blogger

Blogging is a fun and creative way for seniors to make extra cash online. You can blog about anything you want. Some of the best blogs are about niche topics like homebrewing or model trains. But you can successfully blog about anything if you have an interesting personality and a writing style to match. Look for blogging jobs at sites like Academized.

Web developer

Information technology is a large part of the economy, so there are many seniors with experience in jobs such as web development. But how many of them have considered web developing as freelancer in retirement? Some of the tools and technology have changed, but if you’re willing to learn there is work for you as a developer. Besides, updating your skills and learning is a great way to keep your mind sharp and focused. You can find work on tasks such as technical support for businesses that are too small to maintain a full-time IT person. Oh, and did we mention you can do it from the comfort of your own home?

Publish your own ebook

If you enjoy writing, there’s a good chance you’ve thought about writing a book. Very few people actually follow through on this dream, but retirement gives you the time to do it and earn some money while you’re at it. Maybe you’ve been blogging about something for years and consider yourself a bit of an expert. Why not compile all those posts, polish them a bit, and turn them into an ebook that you can earn some passive income from?

Conclusion

The internet offers many opportunities for seniors to earn money working freelance and part-time. Many seniors can make money online using the same skills and knowledge they used in their career.

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March 13, 2019

Tips for Helping Your Aging Parent Move into Their Senior Living Home

Filed under: Assisted Living,Downsizing,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:38 am

helping aging parent move

Courtesy of Elise Morgan

Moving your parents into an assisted living home is almost never going to be an easy process, and although there are many benefits to the transition, it’s inevitable that some aspects of the change will in one way or another upset them. Oftentimes, when being moved into a senior living home, parents may feel abandoned and believe that they are losing part of their identity.

Instead of having your parents feel as though they are ending the life they have always known, ensure them that they are moving into a new chapter of their lives and make the transition as smooth as possible with the following tips.

  1. Encourage Your Parents to Participate in Community Activities

Make the transition smooth and mitigate second-guesses from your parents by introducing them to the community and encourage them to participate in the home’smoving parent to senior home activities. This should be done both before the big move and after – helping your parents make friends and get to know their way around the community.

Assisted living communities have plenty of activities for your parents to participate in, and while not all may appeal to them, some may really grab your loved ones’ attention. When residents feel as if they have a place among the community, it is bound to help their outlook on the transition and even has the possibility of making the move a little bit easier.

  1. Make it Feel Like Home

This is where they will be living from now on, so make it feel like home. Not all assisted living homes have the idea of coziness in mind when designing the rooms, so be sure to bring over any items that can help with this. Some starter ideas to vamp up their new room for comfort is to sprinkle in family pictures and to add color to the walls with new paint or to the floor with a lovely rug. To maximize their bedroom for ultimate comfort, consider bringing in their old bed that they trust, or a new one that they will love instead of the typical assisted living mattress that is not typically designed for comfort. When you prioritize their home living space, your parents will start to recognize this as their new home in no time.

  1. Show Your Parents That They Did Not Lose Their Independence

It’s hard to not feel protective over your parents as they switch to a new home, but don’t feel that you need to be with them at all times during the move. In fact, this can actually hurt their progress, as excessive ‘handholding’ could inhibit your parent from successfully adjusting to their new home. Let your parents feel as if they still have control over their own life, and let them choose their own schedule, their own friends, and other decisions that are most important to them.

  1. Prepare Yourself for Bad Days

This transition is usually not going to be a walk in the park, so prepare yourself for your parents not taking to their new home immediately. You may experience some negative comments here and there, but remember that this is an important time in their lives and that this change is only to benefit them – not hurt them. Instead of taking these negative comments or feelings personally, document them and see them as an opportunity for places of improvement to their lifestyle down the road.

Just like any transition, it will take time to integrate your parents into their new home, but stay positive and know that this way they will lead a healthier and safer lifestyle.

  1. Remember – It Will Get Easier

Even though moving your parents into their assisted living home is difficult right now, know that it will not always be this way. Soon enough, your parents will start to get used to their new lifestyle, and the more that they are involved in the community and activities, the more likely it is that they actually begin to really love it. At the end of the day, remember that you made the right choice for this situation and that you did your best during this difficult time in everyone’s lives.

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February 5, 2019

Bored with Retirement? 4 Ways to Make Your Golden Years Grand

Filed under: Boomer,Downsizing,Retirement Planning,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 11:48 am

Courtesy of Lizzie Weakley

Every year marks a fundamental life change for tens of thousands of people in the United States: the transition from work to retirement. Many people look forward to the moment when they can step away from their job, but some also experience strong feelings of uncertainty about their newfound lack of direction. Whether you are about to retire or already have been for years, there are a few simple ways that help you get the most out of the experience. retirement

Try New Things

It’s easy for adults to fall back on the familiar and stick to old habits, especially immediately following retirement. However, forcing yourself to explore new things can open up opportunities and make the golden years a lot more colorful. Taking art lessons, learning to cook new foods, and meeting new people are just a few ways to bring a breath of fresh air into daily life.

Mobile Living and Travel Lifestyle

Mobile and RV lifestyle isn’t a good fit for everyone, but modern vehicles often sport a number of amenities and conveniences that rival any home. Motor and mobile homes can make travel much more affordable and provides greater control over schedule, pacing, and itinerary. Many state and national parks have dedicated space for people using living vehicles, so there are plenty of interesting sites that accommodate this lifestyle.

Consider Moving to a New House

Many people working towards retirement look forward to spending more time with their family members. Checking out homes for sale near close friends and family can create an opportunity to downsize to a more efficient house and cut down on travel time. Other retirees take advantage of their freedom to find a home in an area that has a better climate, more active community, or other desirable features. Moving shouldn’t be a snap decision, but there can be lot of long-term benefits for those willing to consider a big life change.

Stay Active and Involved

Many older adults find themselves lacking stimulation or excitement in their daily life, which can eventually lead to depression or social withdrawal. There are dozens of different ways for retirees to stay active and involved with people in their community. Retirees with specialized skills can also consider getting a part-time job or consulting on as-needed basis to maintain their professional skills.

People have varying opinions and perspectives about the prospect of retirement, ranging from excitement to dread. However, these years can be among the richest and most rewarding of your entire life if you are willing to take a step into the unknown.

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January 16, 2019

Senior and Single? 4 Ways to Develop a Thriving Social Life

Courtesy of Lizzie Weakley

Being a single senior comes with its own unique challenges. Unfortunately, as you’ve gotten older, it has become more and more difficult to keep old friends and make new ones. Some friends move away and retire to warmer climates, while potential friends maybe aren’t looking to add to their social circle. But there are ways that you can develop a thriving social life. Below you will find four exciting ideas on how to expand your network of friends.

Volunteer
One way to expand your social network is to volunteer your time to worthy causes. Instead of sitting at home by yourself, you can go out and meet a lot of great people who share the same passions as you. For example, if you love animals, then think senior and singleabout volunteering at your local animal shelter. Not only will you get to pet and care for needy cats and dogs, but you will be able to make friends with other volunteers and the shelter staff.

Get Out There and Date
Yes, you’ve already been there and done that when it comes to dating, but dating as a senior is vastly different. For one, you already know what you want and who you get along with. And two, you don’t necessarily have to date in order to get married. Many seniors date in order keep their social life alive and active as well as to seek companionship. Going on a few dates can get you out of the house and back into the world. Try double dating with other couples by going to dinner, the movies, or to plays.

Join a Senior Travel Group
Another great way to increase your social life is to join a senior travel group. These kinds of groups will not only help you make new friends, but will help you see the world as well. Traveling with someone can also help you form tight bonds because of your shared experience. Also, if you are retired, there may be no better time than now to take long trips to countries you’ve already dreamed of visiting. You don’t have a boss to report to, so you can spend more time touring Europe or cruising the Baltic Sea.

Move to a Retirement Community
Lastly, moving to a retirement community can increase your social life tenfold. A good retirement community will allow you to participate in group activities, such as sports or cards, to eat meals with other in a clubhouse, and to go shopping with others. When moving, remember the best way to get the most money out of your house is to renovate, especially if you have old laminate benchtops or floors. You want to make sure you get all you can out of your house so that you have more to spend when buying an apartment or condo in a retirement community.

Remember, the only real way to develop your social life is to put yourself out there and meet people! Follow the above tips to strengthen your odds of finding lasting relationships.

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December 7, 2018

An Incredible Way To Give This Holiday Season – Adopt-A-Senior

Filed under: Seniors,Volunteering — Tags: , , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:54 am

We’re in the throws of the holiday season, everyone is busy planning for company, Help Seniors During The Holidaysshopping, decorating, work obligations, family events, perhaps traveling…and the list goes on.

Sometimes with all that we have brewing during the holidays it’s difficult to make time to give back, but did you know that over 7 million people over the age of 65 fell below the Supplemental Poverty Measure in 2017 and that number is likely to increase this year?

There are plenty of opportunities to give back to seniors in your community during the holidays, here are a few to consider –

Adopt-A-Senior

Adopt A SeniorFounded in 2014 this New Jersey based non-profit programs’ mission is to provide gifts to as many Seniors living in long-term care facilities as possible. For a annual $50 donation the organization will select a Senior(s) on your behalf and ensure that the individual(s) receive their gifts throughout the year. All gifts will be provided to your Senior in your name by the organization. Gifts include: Holiday Gift, Birthday Gift and 2 other Seasonal Gifts during the year.

If you are in the NY/NJ Tri-State area, you can opt to personally shop and hand deliver your gift as part of their Wish List program.

Adopt-A-Native-Elder

Adopt A Native ElderThe poverty rate for Native Americans continues to rise and many need assistance beyond what the reservation’s elder care programs can address. This program, founded in the 1980’s by Linda Myers, focuses on Elders in the remote portions of the Dine’ (Navajo) reservation.

Donors provide $200 annually, covering the cost of a year’s worth of food for an older adult. The program also provides Navajo elders with medicine, clothing, firewood and other essentials. Once you sign on through this Utah-based nonprofit, you’ll receive a photo of the elder you’re paired with, along with his or her contact information, and you’ll be encouraged to stay in touch.

If you are in the Salt Lake City, Utah area, you can volunteer at their warehouse packing food and supplies or with activities such as a Food Run or The Annual Navajo Rug Show & Sale. If you can’t make a donation or attend an event, you are encouraged to share their mission on your social media outlets to help spread the word.

Be-A-Santa-To-A-Senior

This Home Instead Senior Care program partners with local non-profit and community organizations to identify seniors who might not otherwise receive gifts this holiday season. The company then works with local businesses and retail stores to help facilitate the purchase and distribution of gifts by placing trees and ornaments within their various locations. Each senior’s gift requests are written on a Be a Santa to a Senior bulb.

Since the program’s inception in 2003 over 1.2 million gifts have been delivered to deserving seniors.

The program works like this – Find a participating Be a Santa to a Senior location using the search tool on their website. Remove bulb with senior’s gift request from the tree. Purchase the requested gift(s) listed on the bulb. Place bulb and unwrapped gift(s) in the designated box. Volunteers are also needed to collect, wrap and deliver gifts.

There are many ways to touch a senior’s life not only at this time of year, but year round. If at all possible, take time to make someones life just a little brighter this holiday season. It may just be the best gift you’ve ever given.

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September 28, 2018

Declutter Now! No Time Like the Present!

Filed under: Downsizing,Retirement Planning,Seniors — Tags: , , , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:06 am

By: Darleen Mahoney

You have a lot of stuff that you have collected over the years! You have a lifetime of beautiful memories and well, just stuff! You have artwork that you saved from your children and grandchildren, collectibles when collectibles were a fad, clothes that are out of style, paperwork that is no longer relevant. You may even have furniture and old holiday decorations in the basement or attic that just need to find new homes.

Decluttering your home of all these things as an active Senior is a labor of love for your family. It will also make it much easier for you to sell your home and make your next move.

seniors decluttering Leaving the cleaning out and decluttering of your home to your loved ones can be an overwhelming task for them. It is an emotional journey and physical labor of love that adult children and family members endure on their own. They may not know the family history of what is important in your home and can cause family friction. If you declutter your home now, you can share in the memories and find common ground in your cherished family keepsakes.

Whether you hope to live out your days in your current home, retire to a smaller home, retirement community, or the possibility of a continuing care retirement community. The reality is eventually your home will likely need to be sold. Decluttering of the past to move toward the future is a gift that you not only give your loved ones, but yourself.

Studies have shown that clutter causes anxiety, depression, stress, and general feeling of being overwhelmed. Cleaning and decluttering can be a stress-reliever.

There are also tax benefits to decluttering. If you donate your unwanted items to a charitable organization, you may be eligible for a tax write-off. You can also get very creative in donating or re-selling vintage items to re-sell shops or donating to schools looking for theatre production costumes.

Does all of this sound daunting? It doesn’t have to be! Get organized and make a plan!

  • Set aside a weekend or specific timeframe
  • Make sure you have supplies: garbage bags, boxes, cleaning products
  • Start with one room, then have a plan to go room by room
  • Go through everything in that room: Label: Keep, Donate, Trash
    • Old Documents, you may want to shred
  • Ask your family members to join you
    • Keep what is important- not to suggest you throw out priceless mementos, most people find out they do not miss “things” that they get rid of after a clean out. Items that do not serve a purpose or cannot be shared with other family members should find new homes.

While the process of decluttering is giving away, throwing away, and passing along to your loved ones is a process that has an element of an emotional journey with things that tie you of your past. Your memories and family legacies are your true history.

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May 31, 2018

I Know This Is My House, But How Did I Get Here

Filed under: Alzheimer's,Memory Care,Senior Safety,SeniorLivingGuide.com,Seniors,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 12:50 pm

By: Darleen Mahoney

As the rate of Alzheimer’s Disease increases and we seem to be on the brink of a cure Alzheimer's and Memory Careor treatment. It still seems all too futuristic to those in the here and now fighting for loved ones with the disease.

As the idea that there may be a cure around the corner lingers, the disease is still growing in numbers and being aware of the signs at home in order to get treatment as early detection are keys to potentially living more independently longer, subsiding the symptoms.

Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes the slow decline of memory, thinking and reasoning skills. Let’s review basic warning signs. These signs may be experienced differently by each person to varying degrees.

  • Memory loss – One might forget recent information like dates or events. Asking the same questions over and over. Using things like post it notes, reminder notes, electronic devices, or even family to remember things they used to remember on their own.
  • Problem Solving – One might have problems developing and following a plan or working with numbers. They may start forgetting to pay monthly bills, work electronics like phones, stoves, and remotes, etc. that were everyday routine devices.
  • Losing Track of Times and Dates – One might start losing track of dates and time. They may start forgetting how they got somewhere or even where they are.
  • Visual Changes – Some Alzheimer’s patients have experiences changes in vision with judging distance, color, and depth perception. These are problematic to those who may still be driving.
  • Problems with Speech – One might have trouble following or joining a conversation, they may stop in the middle of a conversation or have no idea how to continue, repeating themselves. They struggle with their words and sometimes are unable to find the right words, calling things by the wrong names at times.
  • Misplacing Things – One might start putting things in odd places, losing things, and unable to recall steps to find them. Some may accuse others of stealing those things. This may start occurring more frequently as they may appear to be paranoid.
  • Poor Judgment – One may start having poor decision-making and changes in their judgment. They may not be able to deal with money, giving large amounts away or handling it improperly. This makes them more vulnerable to people who may want to take advantage. They may start bathing less and not taking care of their hygiene.
  • Withdraws from Family, Social, and Work – One might begin removing themselves from their social activities, hobbies, projects, and even their own family. They start avoiding these situations because of the changes that they are experiencing.
  • Mood Changes – The mood and the personality of someone with Alzheimer’s changes as they become confused and become experiencing depression, fear, and anxiety in their daily lives. They are no longer able to find a “comfort zone”.

Clearly, many of these signs can be normal in aging adults. Recognizing multiple and ongoing signs in someone you love should not be ignored, schedule a doctor’s appointment.

There is treatment available with early detection, relief of the symptoms and will help them maintain a level of independence longer.

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