November 29, 2019

Staying Safe and Warm During the Winter Months—A Guide for Seniors

Filed under: Aging,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 8:55 am

seniors health

By Lizzie Weakley

As you get older, your metabolism slows down and your circulation decreases. Common aging-related diseases like diabetes and hypothyroidism can also decrease your cold tolerance. This means that seniors are especially vulnerable to winter dangers like hypothermia, frostbite and pneumonia. Read on to learn how you can stay warm and safe during the coldest months of the year.

Dress in Layers

Bundling up in layers is a great way to stay warm in any temperature because you easily remove outer layers indoors or if the weather changes. Try a long-sleeved shirt under a cardigan with a jacket on top or a hooded sweatshirt with a cotton tee underneath. Accessories like scarves and gloves add extra warmth.

Drink Hot Beverages

A mug of hot cocoa, a cup of hot tea or some java from the corner coffee shop can warm you up from the inside. Holding the hot container can also keep your hands warm. If drinks aren’t your thing, try a steaming bowl of soup or a hot slice of apple pie.

Adjust the Thermostat

Turning the heat up is an obvious way to keep warm, but high heating bills and malfunctioning HVAC systems can be an obstacle for many seniors. If you or someone you love can’t afford to stay warm, look into special programs that help seniors cover energy bills in the winter or pay for heating repair services.

Reverse Ceiling Fans

Your ceiling fan provides a nice cooling breeze in the summer, but did you know that it can also help you stay warm in the winter? Reversing the blades on your fans pushes warm air down into the room to keep you cozy instead of wasting it at ceiling-level. Most new fans have a small switch you can flip to change their direction.

Take Warm Baths

There’s nothing like a warm bath to take off the chill, but remember to be safe in the tub. Install grab bars to help you get in and out, use non-slip bathmats and a bath chair if needed. Check the temperature of your bath with a thermometer to prevent burns. Water that seems fine to the touch may be too hot for soaking. You can get help from a loved one or an assistant if you have trouble getting in the bath.

Although it’s normal to need the thermostat turned up as you grow older, being cold constantly even when the temperature is very warm can be a sign of something serious. If you suddenly get cold more easily than usual or find it difficult to keep warm, schedule an appointment with your doctor.

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November 8, 2019

5 Tips for Dealing with Chronic Pain as a Senior

Filed under: Aging,Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 5:02 am

elderly pain management

By Lizzie Weakley

As we get older, our bodies may begin to require more care and might function less efficiently than when we were younger. After decades of wear and tear, our joints, muscles, and bones begin to ache from years of service. In addition, the older we get, the risk for a chronic illness increases, which may cause chronic pain or discomfort. Fortunately, there are ways to deal with this problem that are both practical and affordable. Check with your doctor before trying any of these tips.

Routine Exercise

Depending on your age and overall health, your doctor may give you approval for starting an exercise program. This can be done at home by watching an exercise program for persons whose circumstances, like age and health, are similar to yours. Alternately, the doctor may suggest joining a local YMCA or recreation center exercise class that meets at least weekly. Exercise can help to strengthen bones while making joints and muscles more limber. Systematic exercise also may stimulate the production of your body’s endorphins, which can ease pain and help you feel better. The immune system may also benefit and contribute to the reduction of inflammation.

Healthy Eating

Avoid inflammatory foods like sugar, and for some, white flour or gluten, may ease physical discomfort. Weight reduction for obese persons can take extra pounds off of the body frame, also reducing physical discomfort. Certain foods or a specific eating plan may be suggested by your doctor or a nutrition specialist to ensure you are getting all the nutrients your body needs to function efficiently, which may in turn lessen physical pain.

Relaxation

If you are a busy person with chronic pain, it may be a good idea to spend some time each day relaxing and escape stress temporarily. Taking a short nap or enjoying nature in the back yard or at the park provides a break from your daily routine, which also have a positive effect on chronic pain levels.

Medical Pain Management

Your GP may provide a referral to pain management doctors who can treat your discomfort from a medical perspective. With many treatment options to choose from, there is a good chance they can find ways to make you feel more comfortable. Pain management experts have the skills and knowledge needed to assist with chronic pain issues.

There is no need to suffer pain in silence. Try tips like these to get your pain under control so you can enjoy a more comfortable lifestyle.

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio. In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and walks in the park with her three-year-old husky, Snowball.

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October 25, 2019

Always on the Go: Maintain Your Mobility as You Age

Filed under: Aging,Mobility,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 5:04 am

Seniors maintaining mobility

By Anita Ginsburg 

Unfortunately, our bodies tend to become weaker, frailer and less agile as time goes on. As a result, we become slower and our reflexes aren’t as sharp. However, that doesn’t mean it has to be this way. There are plenty of ways to keep your body in top form. Granted, this isn’t something that will magically happen nor will it happen overnight. Keep reading for tips on maintaining mobility as you age.

Eat a Nutritional Diet

Having a nutritional, well-balanced diet is one of the best ways to maintain mobility. In fact, one of the most common reasons why our bodies deteriorate is because of a poor diet. Constantly eating things that are high in fat, sugar and preservatives is not healthy, especially for older people.

In fact, we can start to lose muscle mass as early as the age of 30. Make sure to incorporate a lot of fruits, vegetables, grains and nuts into your diet every day. A good way to stay on track is to fill your plate with at least 70 percent fruits and veggies and 30 percent protein.

Manage Your Weight

Eating a healthy diet is beneficial, however, it won’t mean much if you’re overweight. Being overweight not only makes moving harder, it’s also really detrimental to your health. Being overweight is proven to cause health problems such as diabetes, which requires an ongoing medical supply of insulin. As such, it is important that you do everything in your power to maintain a healthy weight.

Exercising is one of the best ways to maintain your mobility while keeping your body healthy. Exercise is also good for our joints. Our joints become more vulnerable to injuries and damage due to the lack of synovial fluid and the cartilage becoming thinner. If you need equipment to help you stay on your feet longer for walks or errands, visit a local medical supply. While it’s important to move around as much as you can, don’t push your body past its limits by ignoring mobility tools available to you.

Take Vitamins

It is essential that everyone consumes the necessary amount of vitamins every day. However, everyone is different and may not be able to consume certain foods or drinks to do so. This is where vitamins come in. You can get vitamins through your local pharmacy or have them prescribed by your doctor. Vitamins are especially essential for people who have certain deficiencies.

Lacking the proper mobility can affect more than our physical health. It also affects our well-being. We might start to lose interest in hobbies, become depressed and we even start to isolate ourselves. Maintaining your mobility will certainly help prevent any of the above-mentioned issues from happening. Make an effort every day to follow these tips and you just might feel like you’re a teen again.

Anita is a freelance writer from Denver, CO. She studied at Colorado State University, and now writes articles about health, business, family and finance. A mother of two, she enjoys traveling with her family whenever she isn’t writing. You can follow her on Twitter @anitaginsburg.

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October 16, 2019

Winter Blues: How The Season Affects Senior Sleep

Filed under: Aging,Seniors,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:29 am

Sleep for Seniors

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), also known as the Winter Blues, affects millions of people every year. A form of depression that occurs at the same time every year, with symptoms diminishing when Spring weather arrives, the likelihood of a SAD diagnosis increases as we age — and seniors who are housebound are especially at risk.

One of the most frustrating aspects of SAD is that it often mimics the symptoms of other illnesses. Seniors exhibiting symptoms of the Winter Blues have been diagnosed with everything from thyroid problems to mononucleosis, often because they don’t make the connection between their symptoms appearing every year and improving with the weather, and because the disruption to their sleep cycles, mood, and behavior is so extreme. For that reason, it’s important for seniors and their caregivers to understand the symptoms of SAD, so they can help ensure a correct diagnosis and the right treatment.

Understanding The Winter Blues

For many people, just the thought of Winter is enough to bring them down. The idea of being stuck inside, with short days, freezing temperatures, and mountains of snow and ice outside, isn’t always appealing. Winter weather can disrupt your usual routine, preventing you from visiting with friends or taking your daily stroll, which can lead to sadness.

It’s not just the disappointment and boredom that can come with Winter weather that causes, SAD, though. Although researchers aren’t certain of the exact cause, it’s believed that the disorder is due to changes in the amount of natural light exposure during the Winter season. The shorter days and longer nights, and in northern climates, the changes in the angle of sunlight, are disruptive to natural circadian rhythms, or the sleep-wake cycle. This disruption disrupts the body’s production of serotonin, a brain chemical that affects mood. Without enough natural sunlight each day, serotonin levels fall, causing symptoms of depression — and significant changes to the sleep cycle.

SAD and Sleep

Although SAD causes many of the classic symptoms of depression — withdrawal, changes in appetite, changes in mood, loss of interest in activities — but changes to sleep patterns are some of the most common. The Winter Blues can cause increases in sleep for seniors, especially during the day, but it can also contribute to insomnia.

Many of these sleep changes are attributable to the changes in ambient light during the day. The human body is naturally attuned to the cycle of day and night. When that cycle changes, and there is more darkness than light or vice versa, the sleep-wake cycle is disrupted. This is only exacerbated by the natural tendency for circadian rhythms to chance as we get older. In general, as we age, we become sleepier earlier in the day, and wake up earlier in the day. But when the sun starts going down at 3 p.m., as it does in some northern climates, that could mean a very early bedtime for some people.

One of the most interesting aspects of the effect of SAD and sleep is the fact that many people report symptoms of insomnia during the Winter, when in fact, they don’t have insomnia at all. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh found that people with SAD often report that they have insomnia, when they are in fact getting just as much sleep as usual. The difference? They typically spend more time in bed, because the seasonal changes cause them to spend up to four hours a day more resting than usual. The perception is that this extra time resting is insomnia — or sleeping to excess — when in fact they’re getting the same amount of actual sleep as usual.

Still, the fact that the Winter Blues can have such an effect on sleep patterns is cause for concern. There are things you can do, though, to support better sleep during the Winter, and reduce the effect of SAD.

Supporting Healthy Sleep 

Encouraging healthy sleep for any age during the Winter months is important for maintaining overall well-being, but it’s especially important for older adults. It’s possible to reduce the symptoms of SAD and improve sleep with a few changes to the daily routine.

    • Consider investing in a “happy light.” Using a special, full-spectrum lamp for a short time every day can help regulate the circadian rhythms and improve mood.
    • Start the day with some exercise. Exercising each day is a key part of healthy sleep. Take a short walk outdoors in the morning if possible, or do a simple indoor workout during bad weather.
    • Practice good sleep hygiene. Create a sleeping area that’s conducive to sleep: Dark, cool, and comfortable. Establish a bedtime routine to encourage sleep; for instance, go to bed at the same time every night, take a warm bath, read, or use specific lotions to indicate it’s time for bed.

 

  • Limit caffeine and alcohol intake.

 

  • Avoid long afternoon naps. If you need to rest, only sleep for 20-30 minutes.
  • Talk with your doctor. If you’re experiencing symptoms of depression or trouble sleeping, your doctor can help by recommending lifestyle changes, further testing to rule out other issues, or prescribing medication.

The good news about the Winter Blues is that they are temporary, and when Spring comes, the symptoms will disappear. There’s no need to suffer in the meantime though. Understanding what’s happening and taking steps to get plenty of sleep can help alleviate the effects and keep you healthy all season long.

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October 12, 2019

4 Solutions to Soothe Arthritic Pain

Filed under: Aging,Mobility,Seniors Health — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 8:41 am

Arthritis in Senios

By Anica Oaks

Arthritis is a name given to a large group of degenerative and painful conditions. They’re all similar in the fact that they are marked by inflammation in the joints of the body. This condition results in pain and stiffness for seniors. Here are four solutions that can help to soothe away your arthritic pain at home.

Hot and Cold Therapy

While this may not seem like a big treatment, it’s very effective for arthritic-related pain. Opt for a long, warm bath or shower in the morning. This will reduce stiffness in the joints. Even a heated blanket or heating pad utilized at night can allow your joints to stay loose the next morning. Reserve cold treatments for relieving the joint swelling and inflammation when it gets to its worst.

Compression Sleeves

You can typically find compression sleeves at your local pharmacy. They will likely have all sorts of sleeves including ones for ankle compression, elbow compression, knee compression, and so forth. The concept behind this type of treatment is that it applies a mild compression to the area that regularly receives inflammation. The compression helps to reduce the amount of inflammation that occurs, which translates to less arthritic pain for you.

Low-Impact Exercise

While your first instinct may be not to move the painful joints, you must reconsider. Low-impact movement can help to loosen up the muscles around the joints. This provides less possibility of inflammation around the joints. You’ll notice that the irritated joints will be more flexible and have less pain when you move them. If you have access to a pool, then doing any sort of exercise in the water is considered low-impact for your joints.

Massage Therapy

Regular massaging of the joints that get inflamed can help to reduce the amount of inflammation in the future. This results in less pain and stiffness for you. With regular massage, you’ll get an improved range of motion that can allow you to be more mobile throughout your everyday life. Talk with a physical therapist about self-massage techniques that you can use for your specific arthritic-related pain.

Relieving arthritic pain doesn’t always have to be done with medication. Rather, the above are some very effective treatment solutions that you can utilize at home to alleviate your pain. Be sure to try various treatment solutions to see which ones your body best responds to and stick with those in the future to help manage your arthritic pain.

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October 7, 2019

4 Ways for Seniors to Improve Their Sleep at Home

Filed under: Aging in Place,Seniors,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 4:41 am

Better Sleep for Seniors

By Meghan Belnap

As we age, it becomes harder to be comfortable. Getting a good night’s rest seems impossible. Seniors can be extremely sensitive to things like temperature and light changes. The National Institute of Health says older people get less sleep and the quality of the rest is not as good as for younger individuals. After age 60, nearly half of seniors experience difficulty sleeping. We talk about four ways the elderly can get the most out of a nap or a night’s rest below.

Warm up the feet to stay cozy

Surprisingly, many people find cold extremities keep them awake. If you always have cold feet, then maybe a thick pair of socks, compression hose, or heated stockings can make a difference. Most heat loss comes out of the top of the head, so wearing a cap to sleep may help some people who can tolerate the feeling while slumbering.

Add thermal room darkening curtains to the bedroom

Nothing disrupts a good nap or a night’s sleep than a bright light. When your sleep rhythm is off, it may be necessary to nap during the day. To get the best rest while the sun is up, a set of light-reducing drapes can make a huge difference. Using a brand with thermal linings can reduce any drafts from windows keeping the bedroom temperature more even. Plus, the curtains can help save energy costs by reducing heat transfer.

Splurge for an adjustable mattress

Mattress sales offer the biggest discounts around the holidays and at the end of winter. Early spring works when you need to find a deal on replacing your bed. If your mattress is over eight years old, then it is a good idea to upgrade your bed. Selecting a model with cooling technologies or functions like raising and lowering the head and legs can make getting to sleep easier. Some people say they get a better nights sleep because they can stay asleep longer without achy legs or stiffness in the back and hips.

Use ambient sound makers

Do you have a favorite nighttime noise like crickets or frogs? Maybe the sound of rain on a tin roof or a river babbling over pebbles is soothing. Ambient sound machines are helpful for some seniors who need white noise to drift off to sleep. Sleep apps and playlists on Internet music sites can also help a person drown out the ringing in the ears to get more sleep.

While we lose the refreshing feeling of sleep as we age, there are things we can do to get a better night’s sleep. Making the room and the bed comfortable is an excellent start. Choosing a quiet place and introducing welcome sounds is another way to fall asleep faster. Individuals with dementia and other health issues may not sleep well at night. Creating a comfortable space for napping at any hour may help older individuals get a better quality of rest.


Meghan Belnap is a freelance writer who enjoys spending time with her family. She loves being in the outdoors and exploring new opportunities whenever they arise. Meghan finds happiness in researching new topics that help to expand her horizons. You can often find her buried in a good book or out looking for an adventure.

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September 23, 2019

5 Ways to Help Seniors Live More Comfortably at Home

Filed under: Aging,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 5:08 am

Comfortable Living for SeniorsBy Anita Ginsburg

With more home health care options currently available for aging seniors, many elders are choosing to live out their golden years at home rather than at an assisted living facility or nursing home. Family members who help to care for an older relative or who check in on seniors who live alone are often the best caregivers for them, as they know the senior’s personality and preferences and will lovingly provide suitable, loving care. Here are five ways to assist aging loved ones in living comfortably in their own home.

Make Frequent Well-Being Checks

If your elderly family member is able to live alone, stop by or call frequently to check on their health and safety. You may want to provide transportation to doctor appointments or other meetings if the senior is unable to drive. Knowing that you will be checking in periodically can be reassuring to an older person living alone.

Assist with Nutritious Meals

Even if your aging loved one can cook, cooking for one person can feel like a chore, so it is a nice gesture to take over a home-cooked meal now and then. Help your relative cook larger batches of food that can be frozen for future meals. You can also have occasional meals delivered or take your relative out to dinner sometimes.

Arrange for Comfortable Bedding

Everyone wants a comfortable bed, but it gets even more important as a person gets older. Quality rest is important for good health. No matter what their needs, you can find a bed that will help your loved one get the rest they need. If they need to stay in bed for long periods of time or if they struggle with back pain, you may consider contacting an adjustable bed supplier. Adjustable beds can relieve back strain and can help your loved one sit up in bed easily without having to fluff pillows or readjust constantly. If you senior has specific needs, you may also look into getting a bed outfitted with hand rails, elevation options, and wheels for mobility.

Organize Social Activities

Staying in touch with other people is important for protecting seniors’ mental health and emotions. Encourage your loved one to join a Bingo group or to take up a hobby, and offer to be the chauffeur to these events. You can also help them organize a social event for them and their friends. Social media may also help aging people to stay in touch with friends and family members they may have lost contact with or who they may no longer be able to travel and visit.

Monitor Health Conditions

Even when things appear to be going smoothly, keep an eye on your loved one’s health and take note of any suspicious new symptoms. Undue fatigue, weakness, loss of appetite, extra sleep, and reduced interest in visitors or communication may be signs of a mental health or physical health condition that needs to be medically evaluated. If an older person inexplicably acts differently than usual, it is probably worth getting it checked out by the doctor.

Older people appreciate the opportunity of living in their own homes as long as possible, but that doesn’t mean they need to be alone. Follow tips like these to ensure their comfort and guard their health.

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July 26, 2019

5 Tips for Handling Back Pain that Every Senior Should Know About

Filed under: Aging,Healthcare,Seniors Health — Tags: , , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:44 am

Back Pain Management for Adults
By Lizzie Weakley

Don’t let consistent back pain slow you down. As soon as you notice discomfort in your upper or lower back, take steps to reduce it so that you can return to your normal life.

Get More Sleep

A healthy night of sleep will actually increase your pain tolerance for the next day. As you get older, it’s easy to start sleeping only a few hours a night. If your pain is bothering you, add a few more hours; you might notice a significant difference.

On the note of sleep, make sure that you’re sleeping on a quality mattress. Firm mattresses offer significantly more support than soft ones and can keep your back in a healthy position.

Stay Active

Just like any part of your body, your back muscles need exercise to be strong. Even if your pain is acting up, attempt to fit in a little exercise each day. Go for walks to keep your lower back muscles active. If you live in a community that offers activity programs join in! Use gentle stretches to slowly strengthen weakened areas. Find a sport or an activity that keeps you moving without putting you through undue stress.

If you aren’t sure about any physical activity, check with your doctor. They may have suggestions specific to your unique physical condition.

Visit a Chiropractor

Back pain can be caused by many different factors. A chiropractic clinic, such as Burman Chiropractic Clinic PC, will be able to assess your pain and offer specific forms of advice.

Most chiropractors can help you immediately relieve your pain through massage or other treatments. They can also make sure you’re standing in a healthy posture, give exercise recommendations, and suggest specific forms of physical therapy.

Use Heat and Cold Intelligently

An ice pack will help you with immediate bouts of pain. The ice will numb the surrounding nerves and reduce inflammation. Use ice for about 20 minutes, then give the nerves in that area a rest.

Heat is used to relax muscles. Consistent heat therapy can reduce tension in a specific area. Try applying a hot pad to your back each night. You can also take a hot shower or soak in the tub. Don’t keep heat on an area for extended periods of time; if you feel uncomfortably warm, take a break and reapply the heat later on.

Buy a New Pair of Shoes

Your shoes dictate your posture throughout the day. Old or worn-down shoes could be the source of your back pain.

Find a pair of shoes that fit well and move the pressure away from your back. Different people have completely different posture needs, so talk to your doctor or chiropractor for specific recommendations.

Address your back pain as soon as you notice it. Your problem may be correctable with medical attention or simple lifestyle changes. If you maintain your health and exercise consistently, you will notice a significant reduction in the pain that you experience.

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July 17, 2019

A Guide to Treating Chronic Pain for Seniors

Filed under: Aging,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 3:17 pm

Chronic Pain for SeniorsBy Lizzie Weakley

Your chronic pain condition doesn’t need to run your entire life. Try these tips to find relief and enjoy more of your daily activities.

Get More Exercise

Regular exercise will strengthen your muscles and keep your body in a better overall condition. Even a small amount of movement each day will help you manage your pain.

If you haven’t exercised in a while, start with simple stretches and a daily walk. Consider enrolling in an exercise class geared toward seniors. Your health care professional will be able to recommend specific exercises that strengthen the area where you experience the most pain.

Look for Natural Alternatives

NSAID pain relievers like ibuprofen or aspirin are good to use in a pinch, but they can have complicated effects with other medications. Extended use of NSAIDs can also result in stomach problems in the long term.

Look for natural forms of pain relief like herbal teas, heating pads, and ice packs. Cold should be used to ease immediate pain, and heat should be used to loosen muscles. You can also try acupuncture, massage, and other treatments to find relaxation.

Seek Regular Treatment

You aren’t expected to manage your pain alone. Many different chronic pain services are available to help you find a long-term solution. Start by talking to your doctor about the options available to you. You might also want to visit a specialist related to your condition.

Don’t let yourself go without treatment. Some cases of pain are truly chronic, but others can be solved with medical care. Pain doesn’t always stem from an obvious source; only a doctor can identify and treat the actual cause of your discomfort.

Get Plenty of Sleep

A full night’s sleep has been shown to significantly increase your tolerance to pain. Adding two hours of sleep to your current schedule could increase your tolerance by as much as 25%.

As a senior, getting enough sleep isn’t always as easy as it sounds. Your chronic pain might even keep you from falling asleep at night. Clear your schedule so that you can sleep in a little later in the morning. You might also consider taking naps in the middle of the day. You’ll feel significantly better when you wake up.

Many seniors only sleep 4-6 hours a day. For pain management, try to average 8 hours; shoot for 10 if your pain is bothering you. If you continually deal with insomnia, your doctor may be able to prescribe a sleep aid to assist you.

There’s no single solution for the management of chronic pain. Your pain specialist may recommend several different treatments; try each option, and stick with the ones that work best for you.

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June 27, 2019

5 Steps to Follow After a Slip and Fall Injury

Filed under: Mobility,Senior Safety,Seniors Health — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 1:30 pm

fall safety for seniors

Courtesy of Anica Oaks

Slip and fall accidents are frighteningly common, and one of those mishaps can result in a major injury that brings your life to a grinding halt. As soon as you are injured on another party’s property, you must take steps to protect your health and finances.

Head to the Emergency Room

Following a slip and fall accident, you should immediately head to a hospital or an emergency medical center to get treated. You will also need to keep an eye out for any delayed symptoms that you might experience in the coming days. That includes unusual headaches, abdominal pain, dizziness, muscle weakness, and chronic fatigue.

Collect Information

It is an unfortunate fact that these cases can become very convoluted, and you are going to need solid evidence if the situation escalates into a lawsuit. In addition to keeping track of your medical treatments, you must also collect the contact information for any witnesses. Many experts suggest that victims should immediately write down exactly what took place as well. Once your adrenaline wears off, you might begin to forget important details.

Notify the Owner of the Property

When it comes time to notify the owner of the property, you need to be very careful about what you say. As a general rule, the only information that you should give them is your name, the date of the accident, and your contact information. Trying to argue or reason with the owner of the property is only going to hurt your case later on.

Contact an Attorney

You deserve to be fairly compensated after a slip and fall accident, and that is why you need to contact a lawyer right away. A slip and fall injury attorney can collect information and build an airtight case on your behalf. One of those professionals might even be able to get you the compensation that you deserve without filing a lawsuit.

Decline to Give Statements

Once you have contacted your attorney, you shouldn’t give statements to anyone else. Claims adjusters and legal representatives will probably start to call you within hours, and those individuals want you to make mistakes. Unless your lawyer is by your side, you should politely decline to give any statements.

In addition to these five steps, you must also follow all of the instructions given to you by your doctors. Those medical experts want to get you back on your feet as quickly as possible, and they are going to come up with a comprehensive recovery plan that helps you avoid long-term health complications.

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