November 7, 2019

Finding an Assisted Living Community That’s Right for You

Filed under: Assisted Living,Nursing Homes,Senior Housing — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 5:31 am

Assisted Living Search

By Brooke Chaplan

If you’ve found that, as you’ve aged, you now need assistance with your daily tasks, then an assisted living facility can be a great option for you. It will provide you with the care you need to live a fulfilling life. Here are some helpful tips to ensure that you find a community that’s right for you.

Make a List of Needs

Many seniors start out by looking at the various assisted living communities and end up getting overwhelmed. Instead, start by making a list of needs. Include everything from the type of medical care that you need to the recreational activities you need in your life. When you have a list of what you’re looking for in an assisted living facility, you can better determine what facility is going to fit your needs quickly.

Set a Budget

Your assisted living care should be easily affordable for you. You should take a look at what your budget is and will be in the future. Set yourself a budget for what you can comfortably afford to pay for your cost of living, keeping in mind your retirement fund and savings. By setting your budget ahead of time, you can limit yourself to looking at facilities in your price range. If you look at facilities first, you may find yourself signing a lease for a place that you end up having trouble affording.

Take a Tour

Now, you should have a very good idea of the qualities you’re looking for in a property and what price range you can afford. Next, it’s time to get your list together of potential properties to visit. You want to take the time to tour each facility to get a feel for how it will work for you. Don’t be shy about visiting a place multiple times before you decide whether or not you want to live there.

Speak with the Current Residents

One of the best ways to get a feel for how a community will work out for you is to talk with the existing residents. See how happy they are with the assisted living facility and get some information about the daily activities that are offered for residents. You may be surprised that you can learn more from a 10-minute conversation with a resident than you’ll get from reading all the fliers about the community.

When it becomes time to move into an assisted living facility it’s likely that you’ll have a lot of questions running through your mind. Understand how to slow down and take it to step by step; this can drastically help with your overall decision on where to stay. Be sure to start by utilizing the four tips above to find an assisted living community that’s right for you.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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October 9, 2019

Adjusting to Assisted Living: A Guide for You or a Loved One

Filed under: Assisted Living,Nursing Homes,Senior Housing — seniorlivingguide @ 4:18 am

Adjusting to Assisted Living

By Lizzie Weakley

As a loved one age, they may find it difficult to care for themselves or maintain their independence without assistance and monitoring. If you or your loved one has made the decision to move to an assisted living home, there are a few ways to maximize comfort throughout the transition and adjustment periods.

Find a Suitable Assisted Living Program

One of the most important steps to take with a loved one who is in need of assistance and care is to take the time to find an assisted living program that is right for your loved one. Take the time to research each individual assisted living program or home you are interested in for your loved one. Read reviews and client testimonials to learn more about individual assisted living homes in your area and to determine which facility is optimal for your loved one’s lifestyle, health conditions, and daily needs.

Help Your Loved One Get Comfortable in Their New Space

Once you have transferred your loved one into an assisted living home, it is important to help make their new space as comfortable and as welcoming as possible. Spend time decorating and adding personal belongings, decor, and various items for your loved one into their bedroom or living space. The more comfortable your loved one feels at their assisted living home, the less likely they are to withdraw socially or become depressed as a result of loneliness.

Visit Regularly

Commit to visiting your loved one regularly once they are living full-time in an assisted living home. Visiting loved ones regularly can help minimize stress and depression in the elderly. Loneliness is serious and can ultimately lead to serious and life-threatening depression and anxiety.

Ensure Your Loved One Remains Active and Social

Always ensure your loved one remains active and social while staying in an assisted living facility. Check-in on your loved one daily to make sure that they are happy and being taken care of by staff. Encourage your loved one to join social gatherings and to partake in hobbies and activities that are hosted by the assisted living facility.

With the right assisted living home, help your loved one to readjust to their new way of living without stripping them of their independence and what it means to care for themselves. By taking the time to help your loved one adjust to their new assisted living home, gain peace of mind knowing that they are in the right place.

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio. In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and walks in the park with her three-year-old husky, Snowball.

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September 26, 2019

Considering Assisted Living? Here’s 4 Things You Should Know

Filed under: Assisted Living,Senior Housing — seniorlivingguide @ 4:28 am

Assisted Living Facts

By Lizzie Weakley

Assisted living facilities can help seniors and other individuals with physical and mental challenges lead better lives. If you’re considering entering an assisted living facility or enrolling a loved one, there are some key things that you should know in advance. Here are four things that you should know about living in an assisted living facility to determine if it’s the right option.

What’s Included in the Cost

Even though the cost of living in an assisted living facility can seem steep, the money spent for residency can cover many living expenses. In addition to housing, the costs of utilities and meals are usually included in the fee. Trash removal and ground maintenance are other expenses that may be included in the total cost of living in a facility. Total costs will also depend on the level of care that’s required for the individual.

Services Offered

The best living centers offer a variety of additional services to make residents’ lives easier. Basic services often include housekeeping, transportation and laundry. Exercise programs and outdoor activities may also be offered. It might be possible to find an assisted living facility that offers bodywork services like acupuncture and massage therapy. Any reputable assisted living facility should provide medical support and at least some basic care services to residents.

Activity is Encouraged

Assisted living doesn’t have to mean giving up independence. The fitness programs at these facilities, which often include yoga, swimming and even dancing, can help each resident maintain a sense of independence while still allowing them to receive all the needed support. The art classes and religious services that are offered at many assisted living facilities can provide further independence. Transportation can even be provided for trips to shopping malls, restaurants and local attractions.

Private Accommodations are Available

Residents can often choose to move into private apartments in assisted living facilities if they want their privacy. Even though residents can live in their own units, they’ll still have neighbors and support staff nearby in case anything bad happens. Living in a shared unit with another resident can also usually be arranged. Some of these private and shared accommodations at certain facilities even allow pets.

Moving into an assisted living facility can be a big decision. This decision can be made easier if all the pros and cons are weighed before choosing to move into one of these centers.

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio. In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and walks in the park with her three-year-old husky, Snowball.

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September 17, 2019

What Are Your Options When a Loved One Develops Alzheimer’s?

Memory Care OptionsBy Anica Oaks

The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s in a loved one can be a disruptive event. You may have many concerns and questions about managing the condition at present and what will happen in the future. Fortunately, family members have several options to ensure their loved one receives appropriate care for their special needs.

Adult Day Care Centers

Adult day care center are a new concept that provides daytime caregiving for seniors and those with memory problems in a stimulating, social environment with trained personnel who supervise activities. Individuals can participate in a variety of group activities, which helps to provide mental stimulation and physical exercise.

Respite Care

Individuals who choose to provide full-time care for their loved one with Alzheimer’s may occasionally have other obligations that take them away from care. Respite care is a system that provides experienced, compassionate care for the loved one, while you are out of town or are taking a break from the demands of caregiving.

Assisted Living Care

Assisted living centers are facilities that offer separate living quarters for residents, but also a range of services to make every life more manageable for them. The facilities generally offer group dining rooms, housekeeping services, group activities and field trips to local events. Assisted living centers offer a measure of independence and privacy, but with ongoing supervision and medical support. They provide careful building security; which can be important for individuals who tend to wander.

At-Home Senior Care

Many seniors prefer to stay in their homes, and home health care agencies offer a variety of services to help these individuals receive necessary care in the comfort of their own homes. You can choose the level of senior care your loved needs and add more features, when needed. In-home caregivers can often be the best solution for working family members who still need to provide care for elders and are concerned about the disruption of changing the loved one’s living situation.

Nursing Home Care

Nursing home care provides comprehensive, 24-hour care for individuals who may be in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease and need full time care. These facilities also have the ability to manage the medical problems that are involved in those who are dealing with Alzheimer’s disease.

Each family has their own needs, and the care needs of your loved one may change over time. Careful consideration of your loved one’s current situation, and consultation with the individual’s physician, can help you determine the best option to ensure their safety and health.

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April 11, 2019

4 Ways to Choose the Right Type of Care for Your Aging Parents

Choosing the right Senior Housing

Courtesy of Emma Sturgis 

Selecting care for an aging parent is a concern shared by millions of children as their parents begin to have difficulties fully attending to their own personal and medical needs. There’s no universal right or wrong answer, but there is a best answer and right type of care based on the answers to some fundamental questions.

Give Your Parent A Voice In Decisions

Whenever possible, include your parent in his/her own care plan and decisions. Start talking about care sooner rather than when a health crisis actually erupts. A huge problem caregivers face, is resistance to care as their loved one is afraid, angry, and saddened by their loss of independence and privacy.

Numerous studies have shown that patient involvement improves both acceptance of care and care outcomes. The Mayo Clinic outlines some helpful tips to help manage resistance to care:

•Plan care talks when the parent is relaxed and open to the conversation.
• Ask their preferences and expectations.
• Describe care in a positive light, but outline the pros and cons of each option.
• Have answers to cost concerns.
• Enlist professional help from medical providers, lawyers, and care managers.

Some parents may be at a point where they’re mentally unable to contribute to care talks. If so, determine if they’ve ever created an advanced healthcare directive, such as a living will. Such documents give a voice to a parent who can no longer make their wishes clear. It also removes some of the decision burden off of care-taking children.

Consider Your Own Involvement In Care

Just as many caregivers forget to give their parent a say, some also tend to forget their own needs in selecting the best care for their loved one. It’s important to consider the following as it relates to your ability and time to attend to your parent’s care needs:

• Do you have children and/or a significant other vying for your time?
• Do you have professional obligations that keep you occupied at a set schedule, on-call hours, random or late hours?
• Can you mentally and physically attend the care needs of your loved one alone, with assistance, or not at all?

The answer to such question are often very different depending on what stage of life you’re in professionally, personally, physically, and mentally. It’s such answers that are often just as crucial as your parent’s state of health in determining the most appropriate source and type of care. Know what you can do, when you can do it, and what assistance you’ll need to do it.

Consider The Level Of Care Needed

Care for seniors can be met through an array of services and housing options. Which one is best will greatly depend on your parent’s mental and physical needs.

• Long-term Care Facilities

LTCs, also commonly called a nursing home, are available for structured, skilled 24 hour nursing care. These provide everything from medication and wound care services to daily routine group activities. As the name suggests, LTC facilities are designed for the long-term management of both acute and chronic disease process.

• Assisted Living And Independent Living

Assisted living and independent living facilities provide less structured care for those capable of attending the bulk of their activities of daily living. Assistance and guidance with things like medication reminders, transportation to and from appointments, housekeeping services, and laundry services are generally offered. The facility usually also offers community spaces for dining and group recreation. The communities are specifically for seniors, but different ones will offer different amenities.

• Memory Care Facilities

These are akin to nursing homes in structure, but they specialize in the care and security needs of people with cognitive diseases like dementia and Alzheimer’s that often leave seniors physically high functioning and mentally low functioning. Note that many senior AL and IL communities are integrating separate memory and LTC facilities on the grounds to make the transition between levels of care as easy as possible for seniors and their loved ones.

• Home Health

This is a care option that can allow seniors to age in place longer. They will remain in the comfort of their own home (or a loved one’s home) with support caregivers that either provide services around the clock or come in at assigned times to perform specified duties. Home health services are vast and cover areas such as personal care, household chores, meals, medication reminders and administration, wound care, medical equipment services, and money management.

• Adult Day Care

This is a service akin to daycare for children. Skilled and semiskilled attendants attend to your parent’s safety, medical, social, and physical needs during the day. This is a good option for working caregivers planning to care for their parent at home.

Do A Trial Run

The options for care are vast, which is good for comprehensiveness of needs. However, the choices can nonetheless be overwhelming. It may take trial and error to ensure that your aging parent is both happy and receiving the level of care they need.

Start by making a list of all the must-have services. You’ll likely find multiple options for care are a fit. Narrow the list down by price consideration. Give the end list a trial run:

• Take your loved one to tour the facilities and/or meet in-home caregivers.

• Go for a meal at a facility and ask if you and your parent can sit in on a group activity.

• Ask for help from local agencies, such Area Agency on Aging, in gathering information about local options.

• Gather references and read online reviews for care service options and specific facilities.

• Since most facilities and services charge on a month-to-month basis, it’s easy to test the waters for a monthly trial.

In closing, these four check marks can help ensure your parent receives the best care possible. Just remember to give both you and your parent a voice in the decision process, understand what care is offered by what specific providers, and realize that you may have to test multiple waters before finding an exact fit.

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March 13, 2019

Tips for Helping Your Aging Parent Move into Their Senior Living Home

Filed under: Assisted Living,Downsizing,Seniors — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:38 am

helping aging parent move

Courtesy of Elise Morgan

Moving your parents into an assisted living home is almost never going to be an easy process, and although there are many benefits to the transition, it’s inevitable that some aspects of the change will in one way or another upset them. Oftentimes, when being moved into a senior living home, parents may feel abandoned and believe that they are losing part of their identity.

Instead of having your parents feel as though they are ending the life they have always known, ensure them that they are moving into a new chapter of their lives and make the transition as smooth as possible with the following tips.

  1. Encourage Your Parents to Participate in Community Activities

Make the transition smooth and mitigate second-guesses from your parents by introducing them to the community and encourage them to participate in the home’smoving parent to senior home activities. This should be done both before the big move and after – helping your parents make friends and get to know their way around the community.

Assisted living communities have plenty of activities for your parents to participate in, and while not all may appeal to them, some may really grab your loved ones’ attention. When residents feel as if they have a place among the community, it is bound to help their outlook on the transition and even has the possibility of making the move a little bit easier.

  1. Make it Feel Like Home

This is where they will be living from now on, so make it feel like home. Not all assisted living homes have the idea of coziness in mind when designing the rooms, so be sure to bring over any items that can help with this. Some starter ideas to vamp up their new room for comfort is to sprinkle in family pictures and to add color to the walls with new paint or to the floor with a lovely rug. To maximize their bedroom for ultimate comfort, consider bringing in their old bed that they trust, or a new one that they will love instead of the typical assisted living mattress that is not typically designed for comfort. When you prioritize their home living space, your parents will start to recognize this as their new home in no time.

  1. Show Your Parents That They Did Not Lose Their Independence

It’s hard to not feel protective over your parents as they switch to a new home, but don’t feel that you need to be with them at all times during the move. In fact, this can actually hurt their progress, as excessive ‘handholding’ could inhibit your parent from successfully adjusting to their new home. Let your parents feel as if they still have control over their own life, and let them choose their own schedule, their own friends, and other decisions that are most important to them.

  1. Prepare Yourself for Bad Days

This transition is usually not going to be a walk in the park, so prepare yourself for your parents not taking to their new home immediately. You may experience some negative comments here and there, but remember that this is an important time in their lives and that this change is only to benefit them – not hurt them. Instead of taking these negative comments or feelings personally, document them and see them as an opportunity for places of improvement to their lifestyle down the road.

Just like any transition, it will take time to integrate your parents into their new home, but stay positive and know that this way they will lead a healthier and safer lifestyle.

  1. Remember – It Will Get Easier

Even though moving your parents into their assisted living home is difficult right now, know that it will not always be this way. Soon enough, your parents will start to get used to their new lifestyle, and the more that they are involved in the community and activities, the more likely it is that they actually begin to really love it. At the end of the day, remember that you made the right choice for this situation and that you did your best during this difficult time in everyone’s lives.

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November 2, 2018

Skilled Nursing or Assisted Living, What’s the Right Choice?

By: Darleen Mahoney

Making the right decisions for an elderly loved can be overwhelming and confusing. Often you may find yourself not really understanding what your options may be or if you even have options when it comes to be the best care of your loved one.  Clearly, you want what is best for them and what is the best facility that can manage their skilled nursing or assisted livingneeds and provide the environment that your loved one requires. Many caretakers ask themselves if they should be choosing an assisted living community or a nursing home/skilled nursing facility?

When making this decision, its important to consider your loved one’s physical, social, mental, and health needs. These will be indicators on the level of care that each will be able to provide your loved one making them a better fit.

Let’s discuss a few of the differences to better assess what each facility will be able to provide your loved and the long-term goals that you are looking to achieve or financial options available to you.

Assisted Living Communities: Typically, the residents at these communities are still active and maintain their own privacy. They may not require significant medical care or constant monitoring, but still receive 24/7 care support. They will have assistance nearby if they do need help with daily activities such as bathing, dressing, and medication. Activity programs are provided, keeping residents active and social and thriving. Although, there are different levels of nursing and medical care offered at some Assisted Living Communities which you may want to explore on an individual basis.

PROS:

  • Home Environment
  • More Private
  • Amenities offered at many
  • Lower Cost than Skilled Nursing/Nursing Home
  • Long Term Care Insurance and Veterans Aids and Assistance may help with costs
  • Scheduled Activities
  • Outings/Transportation

CONS:

  • Does not have extensive Medical Care on Premise
  • Many are not covered by Medicaid or Medicare

Skilled Nursing/Nursing Homes: The residents rely on the staff to provide all or most of their daily living such as bathing, dressing, meals, using the bathroom. They are facilities that provide 24/7 skilled, licensed nurses on staff to provide medical care and assistance. Most of the residents have severe health and cognitive issues. They typically do not leave the facility unless they are being transported to a scheduled doctor’s appointment or hospital.

PROS:

  • Medicare and Medicaid may cover some or most of the cost
  • 24/7 Medical Care with licensed nurses and clinical staff

Cons:

  • Limited personal freedom
  • Hospital environment, including shared rooms
  • Less privacy
  • More expensive than any other Senior facility, but offers the most in subsidized funding

If you are just starting your journey in your search for either Assisted Living or a Skilled Nursing Facility for your loved one, visit SeniorLivingGuide.com . Visit each listing, taking notes on which one may offer your loved one what they need most, the costs and what insurance may provide before making an appointment to visit their location.

This may very well be the hardest decision you ever have to make, make sure that you have all the information and options available to you. Talk to your loved one if they are cognitive, know what their wishes would be for their own healthcare.  When visiting these facilities enter armed with as much information as possible and ask as many questions as possible to help you make the right decision on their behalf.

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June 29, 2018

Be In The Senior Housing Know: Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation

Filed under: Assisted Living,Medicare,Nursing and Rehab,SeniorLivingGuide.com — Tags: , — seniorlivingguide @ 10:31 am

By: Darleen Mahoney

The level of health care and personal care provided varies greatly between a skilled nursing facility and an assisted living facility.  An assisted living facility (ALF) is a long term living environment where the resident’s care is customized based on health and personal needs. A skilled nursing facility (SNF) is a temporary facility based on hospitalization or a significant decline in health.

Skilled nursing facilities include room and board, any necessary physical and/or Senior Housing Skilled Nursingoccupational therapy, social services, medication, speech, audiology, and all care is provided by registered professional nurses. The level of care that they provide may include rehabilitation, tube feedings, intravenous, and rapidly declining health services.

Skilled nursing facilities are also required to meet federal criteria for Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement for nursing care. Skilled care is covered by Medicare for typically up to 100 days after a hospitalization. Once you use 100 days, your current benefit period must end before you renew your SNF benefits. Custodial care may be needed for an extended period. The Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services provides detail on what is covered under each of their plans.

Before choosing a Skilled Nursing Facility, consider the following:

  • Make sure you have a recent medical evaluation with a recommendation for a Skilled Nursing Facility vs. another housing option
  • If 24/7 medical care is required, a skilled nursing facility is best. If custodial needs are required, consider an Assisted Living Facility.
  • Because a Skilled Nursing Facility is temporary, consider the medical needs of the patient and make sure that there may not be an alternate plan. If a family can fill in the gaps in care with adult day care programs, home health care, or respite care there may be alternatives to consider.

If you feel that you or a family member needs a Skilled Nursing/Rehabilitation facility, please visit www.SeniorLivingGuide.com, click on “Skilled Nursing/Rehabilitation”, and your state or area of interest. You will be able to choose from multiple options and review in detail what each one offers and if it meets your needs. Do your research and make the best possible decision for you and your family.

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June 22, 2018

Be In The Senior Housing Know: Assisted Living Facilities/Communities

Filed under: Alzheimer's,Assisted Living,Nursing Homes,Senior Housing,SeniorLivingGuide.com — seniorlivingguide @ 10:56 am

By: Darleen Mahoney

By definition, an Assisted Living Facility (ALF) or assisted living community is housing for the elderly or the disabled that provides nursing care, prepared meals, housekeeping, and other services.

What you can expect from an Assisted Living Care Facility is continuing care providing a combination of personal and health care services designed for individual needs. They offer daily activities, coordinate patients health care, supervise and ensure the overall well-being of their residents.Find Assisted Living on SeniorLivingGuide.com

While the facility may assist in arranging the healthcare for their residents, those residents typically choose their own medical and dental care providers.

Please keep in mind that these communities are intended to be the next step for those who can no longer live alone, but do not provide the same level of care that a nursing home would.

These communities can be freestanding communities or part of larger facilities such as skilled nursing homes, hospitals, continuing care retirement homes, or even part of independent housing communities.

The benefits of Assisted Living Facilities:

  • Maintain a patient’s independence while providing the help they currently need is the primary goal
  • Family relationships and engagement with the community is encouraged
  • Patients level of care is based on need, as their needs change, their care changes.

Most patients of Assisted Living Facilities are seniors, this includes those with memory challenges such as dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

You can rest assured that most states require certifications and licenses in order to register as an ALF.

What can you expect in your actual accommodations? These can vary greatly from one facility to the next. Some might have private rooms, baths, and kitchenettes, others might not. If you would like to see what is available in your area, visit us online at www.SeniorLivingGuide.com, click on Assisted Living at the top of the page, choose your state and city/area of interest, take your time, and see what they have to offer and what meets your needs.

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April 10, 2018

Chicago Pacific Founders Acquires The Willows of Easley in Easley, South Carolina

NEWS RELEASE
Date: Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Contact: John Rijos, President and CEO, Chicago Pacific Founders (312) 273-4750, jrijos@cpfounders.com

Guy Geller, President, Grace Management, Inc. (312) 273-4750, ggeller@cpfounders.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Grace and Pacific Founders LogosChicago Pacific Founders Acquires The Willows of Easley in Easley, South Carolina

Chicago, IL – April 4, 2018 — Chicago Pacific Founders (CPF) and its subsidiaries, CPF Living Communities and Grace Management, Inc., announce the acquisition of The Willows of Easley, a 100-unit senior living community in Easley, South Carolina. The Willows of Easley

The Willows of Easley is an Independent and Assisted Living community located in the heart of Easley, South Carolina, a short 15-minute drive from downtown Greenville, South Carolina. Despite its small-town feel, Easley’s quaint and thriving downtown has many conveniences including popular department stores for shopping, fine dining restaurants, and quality medical facilities. The Willows of Easley, highly regarded for providing quality care and programming, will continue its full spectrum of independent living and assisted living services to its residents.

Grace Management Willows of EasleyTerms of the deal were not disclosed, but investments in the campus will serve to enhance the quality of life for all stakeholders – including residents, families, associates and prospective residents across the region.

The Willows of Easley is now managed by Grace Management, Inc., a nationally recognized leader in the delivery of senior living management services.

“We are thrilled to have found The Willows of Easley and to be in the Easley, South Carolina market. We are committed to providing the highest quality of life possible to all of our residents,” said John Rijos, CPF Living’s President and CEO.

About Chicago Pacific Founders
Chicago Pacific Founders is a Chicago and San Francisco-based healthcare private equity investment firm. The fund is targeting investments in healthcare verticals including senior living and innovative healthcare service-based platforms.

About Grace Management, Inc.
Grace Management, Inc. was established in 1984 to develop, market, and manage residential communities for seniors. While the core of the business is third-party senior housing management, Grace Management, Inc. also offers marketing and operational consulting services, receivership and loan workout services, due diligence review for pending sale or purchase considerations and third-party reviews for various types of senior housing communities. For more information, please visit www.gracemanagement.com.

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