September 27, 2018

Introducing Latitude Margaritaville Hilton Head!

Dynamic new community brings a fun, “no worries” vibe to Lowcountry Living – Plan your visit now by visiting our listing on SeniorLivingGuide.com!

This summer’s grand opening of LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE Hilton Head’s nine Latitude Margaritaville Hilton HeadMargaritaville-inspired model homes drew more than 2,500 aspiring homeowners for a first look at the vibrant new community’s colorful single-family and villa homes. Visitors also toured the Lake Latitude Club that features resort-style pool, beach area, fitness center and party room.

Latitude Margaritaville Hilton Head is located in Hardeeville, South Carolina — the scenic gateway to Hilton Head Island. This dynamic new community for those 55-and-better who are “growing older…but not up” combines South Carolina’s charm and hospitality with Latitude Margaritaville’s “no worries” tropical vibe to deliver a whole new element to Lowcountry living. Sales have begun in the community’s Phase 1 that includes 203 home sites. Plans call for a total of 3,000 homes.

Latitude Margaritaville is a totally new lifestyle concept by master developer Minto Communities and global lifestyle brand Margaritaville Holdings that is redefining active adult living. Latitude Margaritaville presents the lifestyle of fun, food and music portrayed in the songs of legendary singer, songwriter and best-selling author Jimmy Buffett.

LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE Hilton Head is the second of the communities to be Latitude Margaritaville Hilton Headintroduced. The first location in Daytona Beach, Florida was ranked the nation’s most popular active adult community of 2018 by 55Places.com. Additional LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE locations are planned for some of the nation’s most popular destinations, including Watersound, Florida in the Florida Panhandle.

LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE Hilton Head includes walkable neighborhoods, golf-cart friendly streets and a lively Town Center, currently under construction and slated to open in 2019. Music will play an important part in the community with residents enjoying live entertainment under the bandshell and dancing in the Latitude Town Square.

Resort level amenities will include a state-of-the-art Fins Up! Fitness Center with aerobics studio, indoor lap pool, spa, group fitness classes, wellness and community programs and more. Additional amenities include a Paradise Pool with beach entry, cabanas and tiki huts; tennis, pickleball and bocce ball courts; Workin’ N’ Playin’ Center for arts, crafts and other programs, and a Coconut Telegraph Business Center. Residents can relax at a Latitude Bar & Chill Restaurant, Changes in Attitude poolside bar and Last Mango Theater for dances and banquets.

For golf cart tune-ups there will be The Hanger workshop, and pets will be pampered at the Barkaritaville Pet Spa and Dog Park. In addition to the many in-community Latitude Margaritaville Hilton Headamenities, an adjoining 290,000-square-foot golf cart-accessible neighborhood retail center is being developed in partnership with Sutton Properties, Inc.

A wide range of home designs and floor plans are offered. LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE Hilton Head model homes are from three distinct villa and single-family home collections – the Caribbean, Beach and Island. Four villa home models include the Antigua, Barbuda, Jamaica and Nevis, ranging from 1,503 to 1,862 square feet under air. Additional villa floor plans include the Caicos and Lucia. All have two bedrooms, den or hobby room, two baths, covered lanai with option to add a pool, and two-car garage. Villa pricing starts at $243,990.

Five single-family home models include the Coconut, Parrot, Breeze, Aruba and Trinidad.  Additional single-family home floor plans are available, and include the Hammock, Cabana, Bimini and St. Bart. Single-family homes range from 1,684 to 2,564 square feet under air and feature two to three bedrooms plus den, two to three-car garages, two to three-and-a-half baths and a covered lanai with option to add a pool. Pricing for single-family homes starts at $293,990.

The LATITUDE MARGARITAVILLE sales center is located at 356 Latitude Boulevard, Hardeeville, South Carolina. Hours are Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. For information, call 844-388-6777 or visit www.LatitudeMargaritaville.com.

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August 8, 2018

Why Move to A Senior Living Community?

By: Darleen Mahoney

Your neighbors did it, your best friends did it, your newly retired co-workers did it. They all moved to senior living communities, but why?

You arSeniors moving boxes to new senior living communitye now contemplating making the move yourself but want to make the right choice. The house is too big, and the yard is so much work. Now that you are retired, you want to start enjoying it. In truth, that is the point, right?

According to Senior Housing News, in a survey of residents and non-residents of a retirement facility moved to a senior living community they found the following:

  • 5% -current residents made the move because they had a health change
  • 9%- non-residents said that a health change would motivate them to move to a senior living community
  • 6%-current residents moved to avoid home maintenance responsibilities
  • 5%-non-residents said that they would move to avoid home maintenance responsibilities

What you may not realize is that so many of today’s senior living communities are designed just like a vacation resort. These communities have beautiful, modern and spacious floor plans, resort style accommodations and social activities.

You can finally downsize and sell that lawnmower! Check out all the possibilities you may be getting when choosing to move to a senior living community!

  • Lawn maintenance– While you appreciate and want a well-manicured lawn you want to retire from the work. Lawn maintenance is typically included, but still allows those with green thumbs can still consider communities with gardens or patios for small planter gardens.
  • Transportation– Reliable transportation at your fingertips. Even if you are still driving, its always quite a comfort to know that you have transportation available, if needed.
  • Concierge/Housekeeping – Hotel like accommodations such as housekeeping and laundry services and on-site maintenance.
  • Social Activities– scheduled events, trips and activities. Many seniors may discover new hobbies as they enter senior living communities and retirement as they didn’t have the time while working.
  • Restaurant Dining– Meals prepared by Chef’s three times a day. Some communities have multiple dining locations and options if you choose.
  • Medical Care Available– The peace of mind of having proper medical care and staff that can handle a medical situation when needed.

Finding what you are looking for in your area, budget and interest is key. The Senior Housing News survey also found that the majority of respondents aged 70-79 did or would utilize the internet to search online to learn about their senior housing options. A great one stop shop for senior housing options is SeniorLivingGuide.com as the website provides many communities with links to their websites, their social media, and phone number. We invite you to visit when you decide to sell that lawnmower and downsize that home.

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June 14, 2018

Be In The Senior Housing Know: Independent and Active Adult Senior Housing

By: Darleen Mahoney

Independent Senior Housing, Independent Living Communities or Age Restricted Communities are created for Seniors that are typically active, healthy, and do not Seniors Enjoying Independent Livingrequire medical assistance. The biggest factor is the age restriction that is placed on the residents that move in, typically the age is 55+-62, but can vary.  Its not unusual that some new residents are still working and are years away from retirement age. These communities are built in neighborhoods of homes, townhomes, condos, cottages, apartments, or any type of home where the residents can maintain an independent lifestyle. These communities may offer amenities that attract residents like golf courses, pools, community centers, work out centers, and include ground maintenance and security. There is an activity director who plans a calendar of events including group trips, special dances and karaoke nights.

What are the benefits of an Independent Living Community? These communities provide senior specific social environments and activities to residents that appeal to their “senior only” residents.

Residents of an Independent Living Community live alone or as a couple without any type of skilled nursing. If their health declines and they choose to remain in the community, they still have the option to hire home health care providers or private caregivers.

There are many variables on policies as these are set by management. Depending on a public, private, or government managed property the policies may vary greatly. Costs should line up with the market value for similar housing and community in the area. There can be additional community related costs and taxes for landscaping, pool maintenance, etc. There are subsidizes programs through the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development for those low-income seniors in need.

If you are an independent, active adult over the age of 55 you have many options to choose from in Independent Senior Living! Visit us on www.SeniorLivingGuide.com, click on Active Adult/Retirement, then click on your State and Region of Interest and begin researching what each one offers you and your lifestyle! Happy House hunting!

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April 19, 2018

Time Spent with Seniors Is Time Well Spent

By: Darleen Mahoney

The more and more that I work in this industry, I think back to the times that made the older folks that mean so much to me the happiest. They are mostly “a-ha” moments, not anything that I could have bought and shipped through Amazon, texted, or even the quick drop in just to say “hi”. It was the time that was spent visiting with them. It was time sharing a meal, going to CVS to help them pick out a birthday card, sharing the stories of my life, reminiscing about the past, and the times that they themselves were an integral part of my family and daily life. I remember how proud they would be to introduce me and my children to complete strangers. It was like being introduced for a “lifetime achievement” Award at the Golden Globes. That is what we are to our elderly loved ones. We are their lifetime achievements.

When my son was little, his school adopted a Senior retirement community at Christmas time. He was in Kindergarten and they took a field trip to the community, each child “wrote” a book and colored it, we all made Christmas cookies, and the kids sang carols. My son sat in a complete stranger’s lap reading his story with such pride as she intently listened, holding him on her lap so happy with the biggest smile on Seniors Time Well Spenther face. She was so entrenched in his story and hung on to every word that he said. It meant the world to him because he knew she loved his story, and I know it meant the world to her because you could see the visible joy on her face. I sat there and realized I was holding back tears because it made me happy to see this connection between two strangers vastly different in years. I regret that he never saw her again, I truly believe that it would have been really good for them both.

Buckner Parkway Place, a senior living community in Houston, Texas hosted a group of young people who volunteered at their community through their local high school. “This partnership with Westside High is what Buckner is all about,” said Susan Phelps, executive director of Parkway Place. “Buckner exists to serve both vulnerable children and senior adults, and what better way to do that than by engaging a multi-generation partnership with students who otherwise might not have these opportunities? Plus, seeing the way Parkway Place residents light up around these students is a joy. I feel more confident than ever about the future of senior living because of their eagerness to serve.” http://www.buckner.org/blog/learning-to-serve

Family life is changing. Unlike in the past, when extended families lived close to each other, older folks are living longer and more self-sufficiently, but they are also living alone. With the change in lifestyle and the growing distances from family members, even though their adult children have healthier and more active parents, they are less likely to visit them, and their grandchildren are less likely to know and visit their grandparents as often as in the past.

Developing connections between young and old generations can help both groups. Visit your local Senior Center, Senior Community and ask how you can volunteer by spending time with their residents. You can also visit http://www.servingseniors.org/get-involved/advocacy/ , include children in advocacy, they too are your future. #payitforward

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April 10, 2018

Chicago Pacific Founders Acquires The Willows of Easley in Easley, South Carolina

NEWS RELEASE
Date: Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Contact: John Rijos, President and CEO, Chicago Pacific Founders (312) 273-4750, jrijos@cpfounders.com

Guy Geller, President, Grace Management, Inc. (312) 273-4750, ggeller@cpfounders.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Grace and Pacific Founders LogosChicago Pacific Founders Acquires The Willows of Easley in Easley, South Carolina

Chicago, IL – April 4, 2018 — Chicago Pacific Founders (CPF) and its subsidiaries, CPF Living Communities and Grace Management, Inc., announce the acquisition of The Willows of Easley, a 100-unit senior living community in Easley, South Carolina. The Willows of Easley

The Willows of Easley is an Independent and Assisted Living community located in the heart of Easley, South Carolina, a short 15-minute drive from downtown Greenville, South Carolina. Despite its small-town feel, Easley’s quaint and thriving downtown has many conveniences including popular department stores for shopping, fine dining restaurants, and quality medical facilities. The Willows of Easley, highly regarded for providing quality care and programming, will continue its full spectrum of independent living and assisted living services to its residents.

Grace Management Willows of EasleyTerms of the deal were not disclosed, but investments in the campus will serve to enhance the quality of life for all stakeholders – including residents, families, associates and prospective residents across the region.

The Willows of Easley is now managed by Grace Management, Inc., a nationally recognized leader in the delivery of senior living management services.

“We are thrilled to have found The Willows of Easley and to be in the Easley, South Carolina market. We are committed to providing the highest quality of life possible to all of our residents,” said John Rijos, CPF Living’s President and CEO.

About Chicago Pacific Founders
Chicago Pacific Founders is a Chicago and San Francisco-based healthcare private equity investment firm. The fund is targeting investments in healthcare verticals including senior living and innovative healthcare service-based platforms.

About Grace Management, Inc.
Grace Management, Inc. was established in 1984 to develop, market, and manage residential communities for seniors. While the core of the business is third-party senior housing management, Grace Management, Inc. also offers marketing and operational consulting services, receivership and loan workout services, due diligence review for pending sale or purchase considerations and third-party reviews for various types of senior housing communities. For more information, please visit www.gracemanagement.com.

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March 27, 2018

No Longer The Shuffleboard Generation

Filed under: Boomer,Retirement Community,Senior Housing — seniorlivingguide @ 4:11 pm

By: Darleen Mahoney

The baby boomer generation is no longer the generation of shuffleboard, craft nights, and pot roast for dinner in the dining hall. They want more, they are demanding a different lifestyle.

Now that we have that in the open, what do baby boomers want in their retirement homes? How do you go about getting not only what you want, but what you need?

The best advice: do copious amounts of research on what is available in the location that is ideal for you – including additional support nearby and social opportunities available – and be realistic about your long-term physical needs, your financial resources. “It’s important to align the emotional, social and financial parts of retiring,” says Denise Leish, a financial adviser in Silver Spring, Maryland.

The basic foundations in a retirement community that you should look for:

  • Transportation – Senior transportation programs
  • Parks nearby and walkable neighborhoods
  • Safe neighborhoods-check the crime rates
  • Health care- Available health care nearby with doctors that accept Medicare, specialists, and hospitals
  • Other services – Meals on Wheels and other Senior focused services
  • Shopping, Grocery Stores and Restaurants – Close enough that you will be able to get out and enjoy the community and social activities without a long drive.
  • Social Integration – Neighborhood activities, programs, travel opportunities, etc.

Sara Little, 68, and Barbara Shaver, 69, offer a few pieces of advice on making a move into retirement especially if you decide to relocate to a new area, make sure you like the area before you buy and do it while your still young and can enjoy it. They moved to an over-55 community in Sarasota, Florida, they rented nearby to make sure they’d like the area. At the core of their decision: They had “some grounding” there, Little says.

“We had friends who already lived here, and more were moving here,” Little says. “We also got involved in church right away and in activities like swimming and sailing”  https://www.cnbc.com/id/100549801.

In response to baby boomers’ demands for a different kind of retirement lifestyle, many developers are designing communities with a village feel to them to include shopping, dining, professional services and community programs. One good example is The Villages in Central Florida, which calls itself the “premier active adult community”. It is quite large, with an estimated 157,000 retirees, it touts its own zip code and daily newspaper. Another example, The Classic at Hillcrest Greens, is built on the site of a former golf course in the western Wisconsin community of Altoona. Its amenities include a restaurant, yoga and fitness studio, game room, library and a salon.

Its fair to say that there is something for everyone if you are entering the age of retirement and a 55+ community is an option. You no longer must settle for a retirement community whose only activities are shuffleboard and golf, there is so much more! Spend some time and do your research. Know what is available and don’t be afraid to ask questions and visit these locations and get to know your future neighbors.

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February 27, 2018

Why Is Texas Becoming A Retirement Hot Spot?

By: Darleen Mahoney

Texas is at the top of many retiree’s lists when looking for their ideal state to retire and enjoy their “golden years”.  What does Texas offer that is attracting retirees, specifically Baby Boomers, to the Lone Star State?

Texas is the second largest state in the country and offers a wide variety of topography and open spaces for them to live around. The choices range from mountainsides with views of plains and prairies to coastal plains and forested hill country. There are independent and active adult communities new and existing with the amenities and social opportunities that retirees may be looking for today. If you are looking for a fast-paced town with concerts and night life or peace and quite in a natural environment, Texas has them all. http://www.nic.org/blog/key-takeaways-lone-star-states-seniors-housing-market/

While Florida is clearly still at the top of the list for many retirees moving from the North to enjoy the sunshine and beaches, Texas offers many of the same attributes in their weather conditions, which can be a big draw.  The mild temperatures vary within the state and provide many opportunities for retirees who want hot summers and cool winters, like San Antonio or Austin. If they prefer a bigger city with a lot of diversity and activity, baby boomers may be attracted to Houston and Dallas, even though they have higher humidity during the summer with more rain.

While some of the biggest draws are the weather, topography, and local activities; it Find Senioi Housing in Texas using SeniorLivingGuide.commay come down to the brass tacks of affordability. Texas has lower taxes, a lower cost of living, and a reduced tax rate (including no personal income tax). This is important because a retiree with a fixed income is going to be able to make their budget go farther. Therefore, it’s no surprise the state of Texas would be considered one of the best places to retire financially.

Whatever the reasons – varied landscape, warmer climate, diverse cities, or affordability- Texas is attracting retirees. Texas active adult communities are growing to accommodate this emerging growth, meet the needs of the Baby Boomers, and ultimately become a retirement destination for active adults.

Visit us on www.seniorlivingguide.com , click on Texas to visit different Senior Housing available in the Lone Star State.

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February 20, 2018

Is A Continuing Care Community Right for You?

By: Darleen Mahoney

I am on my own personal journey to discover what the best decisions are for my Dad. He is 71 years old and starting to decline both physically and mentally. He decided to be independent and retire in a 55+ restrictive community years ago, but I see the need for additional long-term services for him in the near future. On this journey, I found myself needing a clear vision on what are our options might be that would be best for him and his needs.

I started looking at continuing care community options – what they entail and if it would be a good fit. I regretted that this option was not considered years ago and wondered if it was too late for him to make this move.

Continuing care communities are independent living housing with all the perks of the social, recreational and other retirement community extras that keep independent seniors active. They also have two additional tiers of care available – assisted living and nursing level care. Later, if the independentContinuing Care Retirement Community senior’s health declines, they can smoothly transition to the assisted living tier, and then, the nursing side, if needed.

According to the AARP, “Nearly 90% of people 65 and older said they would like to ‘age in place.’ And yet the hard truth is that a beloved house in a familiar community can become both physically impractical and socially isolating over time”. http://time.com/money/4579934/continuing-care-retirement-communities-cost/

Once you decide that this is a viable option for you or your loved one to explore, it’s a matter of choosing which one would be right for you.

The AARP recommends that you take many steps to make this determination:

https://www.aarp.org/home-garden/housing/info-08-2009/ginzler_housing_choices.html

  • Visit multiple residences
  • Take a tour, talk to the residents, staff, and visiting family members.
  • Ask staff members how long they’ve worked there; a good sign of quality is low turnover.
  • Check with the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. Many assisted-living residences, nursing homes, and CCRCs voluntarily apply for accreditation, which means they meet many quality measures.
  • Get clear information on financial arrangements and costs
  • Discuss at length with your loved ones, they will help you make a good decision in your best interest.

Regardless of whether a continuing care community is right for you or your loved one, it’s always best to be informed and proactive when making plans of this magnitude. Their health and happiness in the long term is dependent on finding the best senior living arrangement.

When you’re ready to begin your search, remember SeniorLivingGuide.com – the nation’s fastest growing senior housing and services resource!

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Is A Continuing Care Community Right for You?

By: Darleen Mahoney

I am on my own personal journey to discover what the best decisions are for my Dad. He is 71 years old and starting to decline both physically and mentally. He decided to be independent and retire in a 55+ restrictive community years ago, but I see the need for additional long-term services for him in the near future. On this journey, I found myself needing a clear vision on what are our options might be that would be best for him and his needs.

I started looking at continuing care community options – what they entail and if it would be a good fit. I regretted that this option was not considered years ago and wondered if it was too late for him to make this move.

Continuing care communities are independent living housing with all the perks of the social, recreational and other retirement community extras that keep independent seniors active. They also have two additional tiers of care available – assisted living and nursing level care. Later, if the independentContinuing Care Retirement Community senior’s health declines, they can smoothly transition to the assisted living tier, and then, the nursing side, if needed.

According to the AARP, “Nearly 90% of people 65 and older said they would like to ‘age in place.’ And yet the hard truth is that a beloved house in a familiar community can become both physically impractical and socially isolating over time”. http://time.com/money/4579934/continuing-care-retirement-communities-cost/

Once you decide that this is a viable option for you or your loved one to explore, it’s a matter of choosing which one would be right for you.

The AARP recommends that you take many steps to make this determination:

https://www.aarp.org/home-garden/housing/info-08-2009/ginzler_housing_choices.html

  • Visit multiple residences
  • Take a tour, talk to the residents, staff, and visiting family members.
  • Ask staff members how long they’ve worked there; a good sign of quality is low turnover.
  • Check with the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. Many assisted-living residences, nursing homes, and CCRCs voluntarily apply for accreditation, which means they meet many quality measures.
  • Get clear information on financial arrangements and costs
  • Discuss at length with your loved ones, they will help you make a good decision in your best interest.

Regardless of whether a continuing care community is right for you or your loved one, it’s always best to be informed and proactive when making plans of this magnitude. Their health and happiness in the long term is dependent on finding the best senior living arrangement.

When you’re ready to begin your search, remember SeniorLivingGuide.com – the nation’s fastest growing senior housing and services resource!

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February 5, 2018

Home Staging for Seniors: Best Practices for Bigger Returns

By: Darleen Mahoney

Once it’s been decided that potentially downsizing for retirement living or moving into a senior living community is on the horizon, the most stressful aspect can be selling the home. There are many things to consider outside of the emotional tolls of leaving a home with years of memories attached. There is also the reality that the house itself is most likely the largest source of income/equity, therefore, its very important to sell the house at the best price that the market will allow.

Staging a home and making it more appealing to a wide range of buyers is a best practice and that may be challenging for some Seniors while they are still living in the home. There are a few options for staging a home. It can range from keeping living spaces very organized and decluttered and quick paint fixes to having a professional “stage” the home for sale. Typically, a service will stage a home to make it look larger, utilize neutral colors and will take any personal items of the current homeowner and put them away. These services may replace existing furniture and other personal items which can be stressful for Seniors but can also raise the value of the home. Buyers should not focus on the current homeowner’s taste, style and personal choices.

If a Senior is moving to an Assisted Living community, they will most likely need to downsize right away. This can be such a taxing process both emotionally and physically. According to AARP https://www.aarp.org/work/retirement-planning/info-08-2011/retirement-downsizing.html , it’s recommended that you plan to, “hit the ‘heart of the home’ rooms first. That’s usually the kitchen, living room, and family room, which tend to be the most cluttered and contain items with the greatest emotional value and everyday use. Make four piles-keep, donate, give to family members and trash.”

Other things to consider while staging is touching up paint, changing out hardware, new blinds, replacing burned out lightbulbs, adding fresh flowers or potted plants, fixing visible issues around the house that a buyer would notice, and rearranging furniture to create the look of a larger space. Best practice is to keep in mind that when a potential buyer walks through your home, they need to be able to picture their own personal items and sense of style as well. If there is a strong color palette in the home, it may be necessary to re-paint a more neutral palette to assure that the potential buyer is seeing the actual house and not just the wall colors.

Also, consider the front of the house. A potential buyer should never drive up and before they even enter the house think, “what a lot of work” before entering the home.

Remember the most important things in staging with Seniors is that there may be more emotional attachments to their personal tastes and their personal items Its important to be cognizant of that and walk through the process at their pace while explaining why “staging” will only benefit them in the long run.

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