June 12, 2012

Hospice & Palliative CareCenter to Sponsor Camp Carousel For Children, Teens & Adults Grieving the Death of Loved Ones

Filed under: Hospice,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 8:42 am

WINSTON-SALEM, patient N.C., sales  June 11, nurse 2012 – Camp Carousel begun 22 years ago by the Grief Counseling Center of Hospice & Palliative CareCenter – will hold its 2012 summer bereavement camp Monday, July 23 – Friday, July 27.  The camp is designed to help grieving children and teens from rising first graders through rising high school seniors as well as adults learn how to cope with death-related loss in healthy ways.

“Throughout the week, attendees meet others who are grieving similar death-related losses, which is also an essential component of Camp Carousel,” explains Donna Hampton, Director of Grief & Bereavement Services at Hospice & Palliative CareCenter.

“We seek to help promote healthy mourning through small group grief sessions, creative play, art therapy, expressive movement, music therapy, animal-assisted therapy, and writing.  Camp Carousel activities are designed to provide campers with a natural outlet for the expression and understanding of the intense—and often unfamiliar—feelings that accompany significant death-related losses.”

Camp Carousel includes age-appropriate grief support groups, which will meet at specific times during the week of July 23 – 27, on Hospice’s campus at 101 Hospice Lane, off Bolton Street/Burke Mill Road, in Winston-Salem. The program will culminate on Friday, July 27, with a Memorial Balloon Release ceremony at Bolton Park for all participants involved throughout the week and their families.

Camp Carousel is facilitated by Grief Counseling Services masters-prepared counselors and by carefully-trained volunteers.  Many of the volunteers at Camp Carousel are school counselors, graduate students in counseling programs, and those who have benefitted from attending Camp Carousel due to their own death-related losses in the past.  In addition to working with children and teens, counselors also offer direction to parents on ways to better understand their child’s grief process.  Anyone in the community who is grieving a death-related loss can attend Camp Carousel.  There is no time limit regarding when the death occurred.

 

Following is the schedule for this year’s Camp Carousel:

  • Grief Groups for Children

      Monday – Thursday, July 23-26, 9:00 a.m.-Noon

101 Hospice Lane, off Bolton Street/Burke Mill Road, in Winston-Salem

 

  • Teen Grief Groups

Monday and Wednesday, July 23 & 25, 6:00–9:00 p.m.

101 Hospice Lane, off Burke Mill Road, in Winston-Salem

Dinner will be provided.

 

  • Adult Grief Groups 

Tuesday and Thursday, July 24 & 26, 6:00-9:00 p.m.

101 Hospice Lane, off Burke Mill Road, in Winston-Salem

 

  • Memorial Balloon Release for All Participants and their Families          

Friday, July 27, 6:30 p.m.

Bolton Park (near Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s campus in Winston-Salem)

 

If you are interested in attending Camp Carousel or know of someone who would benefit from these programs, contact Donna Hampton, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter, at 336-331-1319 or go to the website, www.hospicecarecenter.org.

The cost for Camp Carousel is $25 per person.  Partial and full scholarships are available.

 

Since 1979, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter has been committed to providing quality medical, emotional, spiritual, and social support to patients and families who face a serious illness – regardless of diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment.  Today, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter provides these services in a 13-county area from four offices (Mocksville, Walnut Cove, and Salisbury in addition to Winston-Salem) and the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home.  Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s Grief Counseling Services offers bereavement services to families of Hospice patients as well as grief counseling to the community at large. Hospice also offers pediatric palliative care to infants, children and their families.  For more information about Hospice & Palliative CareCenter, contact Ann Gauthreaux, public relations director, at 336-768-3972, or see Hospice’s website at www.hospicecarecenter.org.

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April 27, 2012

Hospice & Palliative CareCenter to Unveil Meditation Garden & Labyrinth on May 5

Filed under: Hospice,Senior Housing Events,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 3:23 pm

WINSTON-SALEM, ed N.C., April 20, 2012 – Hospice & Palliative CareCenter will sponsor the community opening of the Glenn & Wilma Pettyjohn Meditation Garden & Labyrinth on Saturday, May 5, 2012, in coordination with World Labyrinth Day.   People around the world will Walk as One at 1,” with labyrinth walks scheduled for 1:00 p.m. in all time zones.  Hospice & Palliative CareCenter will hold its community opening of the labyrinth from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.  The public is invited to stop by during these hours to walk this outdoor labyrinth and celebrate this special gift to Hospice and the Winston-Salem community.  In the event of rain, the opening will be rescheduled for a later time.

The 5-circuit labyrinth is located behind the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home, located at 101 Hospice Lane, and is carefully designed to respect the natural beauty found on Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s Winston-Salem campus.  The garden is dedicated to the memory of the late H. Glenn Pettyjohn by his wife, Wilma Kiger Pettyjohn.

Labyrinths have existed for more than 4,000 years and are found in many cultures throughout the world.  They have long been used as a place for rest and reflection. Unlike a maze, a labyrinth has only one path leading into the center and back out again.  There are no dead ends or decisions that must be made to determine the course. The journey in and out of the labyrinth is often viewed as a metaphor for life, and provides opportunities for contemplation, meditation, and self-care.

For more information about the labyrinth or the World Labyrinth Day community opening, call Hospice & Palliative CareCenter at (336) 331-1331.

Since 1979, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter has been committed to providing quality medical, emotional, spiritual, and social support to patients and families who face a serious illness – regardless of diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment.  Today, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter provides these services in a 13-county area from four offices (Mocksville, Walnut Cove, and Salisbury in addition to Winston-Salem) and the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home.  Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s Grief Counseling Services offers bereavement services to families of Hospice patients as well as grief counseling to the community at large. Hospice also offers pediatric palliative care to infants, children and their families.  For more information about Hospice & Palliative CareCenter, contact Ann Gauthreaux, public relations director, at 336-768-3972, or see Hospice’s website at www.hospicecarecenter.org.

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April 13, 2012

Hospice & Palliative CareCenter to Promote National Healthcare Decisions Day on April 16

Filed under: Home Health Care,Hospice,Senior Housing Events,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 7:48 am

WINSTON-SALEM, seek N.C., April 12, 2012Hospice & Palliative CareCenter, along with other national, state and community organizations, is leading an effort to highlight the importance of advance healthcare decision-making — an effort that has culminated in the formal designation of April 16 as National Healthcare Decisions Day (NHDD).  As a participating organization, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter is providing information and tools for the public to talk about their wishes with family, friends and healthcare providers, and execute written advance directives –  the NC Healthcare Power of Attorney and the Living Will.

Specifically, on April 16, at 1:30 p.m., Hospice & Palliative CareCenter is welcoming the public to attend a free information session on this topic at Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s A. Tab Williams Education & Counseling Center (Building 121), 101 Hospice Lane, in Winston-Salem.  Staff will go over the N.C. documents and talk about important issues to consider.  Everyone will receive a free copy of the N.C. Living Will and Health Power of Attorney.  For those who would like to complete these documents, notaries will be present.  Call 336-331-1309 to reserve your spot, or for more information.

Hospice & Palliative CareCenter will partner with BestHealth at Hanes Mall in offering a program on Advance Directives on Friday, April 20, 1:00 – 3:00 p.mCall 336-713-2378 to reserve your spot, or for more information.

“As a result of National Healthcare Decisions Day, many more people in our community can be expected to have thoughtful conversations about their healthcare decisions and complete reliable advance directives to make their wishes known,” said Dee Leahman, Director of the Community Partnership for End of Life Care, a program of HPCC.  “Fewer families and healthcare providers will have to struggle with making difficult healthcare decisions in the absence of guidance from the patient, and healthcare providers and facilities will be better equipped to address advance healthcare planning issues before a crisis and be better able to honor patient wishes when the time comes to do so.”

Since 1979, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter has been committed to providing quality medical, emotional, spiritual, and social support to patients and families who face a serious illness – regardless of diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment.  Today, Hospice & Palliative CareCenter provides these services in a 13-county area from four offices (Mocksville, Walnut Cove, and Salisbury in addition to Winston-Salem) and the Kate B. Reynolds Hospice Home.  Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s Grief Counseling Services offers bereavement services to families of Hospice patients as well as grief counseling to the community at large. Hospice also offers pediatric palliative care to infants, children and their families.  For more information about Hospice & Palliative CareCenter, contact Ann Gauthreaux, public relations director, at 336-768-3972, or see Hospice’s website at www.hospicecarecenter.org.

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March 16, 2012

Hospice & Palliative CareCenter to Sponsor Annual Hospice Hope Run on April 14

Filed under: Hospice,Senior Housing Events,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 10:37 am

Hospice Care Center

WINSTON-SALEM, rx N.C., March 15, 2012 – Hundreds of runners and walkers are expected to participate in the 16th annual Hospice Hope Run ? a 10K run and 5K walk/run  ? set for Saturday, April 14, at the Deacon Tower at BB&T Field in Winston-Salem. There will also be a Deacon Dash for children under 8 years old.

Registration begins at 7:15 a.m. followed by an aerobic warm-up at 8:30 a.m.  The 5K walk/run (3.1 miles) takes off at 9:00 a.m., and the 10K run, on an USATF Certified Course, will start at 9:15 a.m.  Both begin and end at the Deacon Tower.  The Deacon Dash will be held at 10:30 a.m.   The awards presentation follows the events.

The runs and walk are open to anyone interested in participating, and the proceeds will benefit patient care at Hospice & Palliative CareCenter.  Everyone is also invited to stay for the Wake Forest Demon Deacon Spring football game that follows the Run at 1:00 p.m.

The Primo Team Tailgate will offer a special location for teams of 25 or more to meet and rally before and after the Run. Reserved team spaces give team members a spot near the start and finish area and near the main entrance to BB&T Field.

“Over the past 16 years participation has grown, not only because of the fun and competition, but because the experience is so meaningful,” Ann Gauthreaux, Hospice public relations director, says. “It’s a great opportunity to honor or remember a loved one.  We’ve also made it even easier to sign up by going to our website at www.support4hospice.org.”

The entry fee for non-competitive runners is $25 on or before April 8th and $30 after.  For timed D-tag timing system participants the fee is $30 ($35 after April 8th), and the fee for children under 8 in the Deacon Dash is $15.  The fee includes a custom-designed T-shirt, pre-run and post-race refreshments, awards, door prizes, and entertainment.  For an additional $5 donation, participants can also choose to receive a Tyvec Placard on which they may write the name of someone who was special in their life and wear their name to honor and remember them as they participate in the Hope Run. People may also be part of the fun without taking part in the run or walk by signing up as a Proud in the Crowd participant for a gift of $25. Proud in the Crowd participants will also receive the 16th Annual Hospice Hope Run commemorative designed T-shirt.

BB&T is the major sponsor for this year’s Hospice Hope Run.  Kimberly Van Scoy and Michelle Kennedy, both of WXII 12 News, along with Lora Songster of WMAG 99.5, are this year’s honorary chairs.

All proceeds from the Hospice Hope Run go to the Hospice & Palliative CareCenter. The majority of Hospice & Palliative CareCenter’s revenue comes from the reimbursement from Medicare, Medicaid and Private Insurance. No one is turned away because of their inability to pay. The financial gap between reimbursement and patient needs amounts to approximately $1.7 million dollars a year.

For more information about the Hospice Hope Run, go to www.support4hospice.org or call Carolyn Breese at Hospice & Palliative CareCenter at 336-768-3972.

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February 24, 2012

Life Choices – When is quality more important than quantity?

Filed under: Healthcare,Hospice,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 12:37 pm

by Kelly Wilson, tadalafil Publisher – South East Florida Senior Living Guide – www.seniorlivingguide.com
I do not nor have I ever worked for any hospice provider, see but I have had the opportunity and privilege to care for people, 13 to be exact, that had hospice services in the last weeks, months and sometimes even years of their lives. I have since changed professions and now attend various lectures and presentations regarding healthcare services, some of which the primary topic is hospice care. There are a few different providers here in our SE Florida area but the fundamental concept is universal. Also universal is the uncomfortable feeling the word “hospice” seems to create, the lack of public education, awareness and timely intervention by way of open discussion even among our healthcare providers.

Let me share a little something I heard at a recent lecture. Over the last 100 years our medical advances have come quite close to doubling our life expectancy. What was once considered a ripe old age was 46; it is now 80 years old. Nevertheless, with all this medical technology we will ultimately reach an end to our life here on earth as we know it.

We are now able to diagnose and treat many illnesses with modern advances in medicine. Over the years safety improvements of our vehicles and workplace environments have reduced sudden and accidental deaths. Approximately 90% of deaths are predictable, with many enduring lengthy courses of treatment. It is under these circumstances that the question can be asked, when is quality more important than quantity? When is the right time to opt for comfort and care when there is no cure? This is such a frightening thought, the family, the patient and even the treating physicians sometimes feel the need to fight the battle to the bitter end. This battle statistically has been shown to sometimes shorten the length of life and with it the quality.

Critical and terminal illness know no barriers like age, race or religion. That being fact we need to all become aware and educated on options. Those options include the invaluable services of hospice providers that are not only focused toward the patient but extend to the entire family, providing spiritual, emotional and physical support in the home, assisted living, nursing home, hospital or any setting the patient is comfortable in. State of the art care is delivered by some of the most caring and compassionate physicians and nurses as well as social workers, music therapists and massage therapists just to name a few.

Please make it your business to seek out information, attend a presentation or an educational lecture. Share and talk about experiences with family and friends. We have no control over the fact that we will all die, but for some, we can have control over how we and those around us will experience the last leg of the journey. Human nature is to fear what we do not know…if or when you are faced with a difficult decision you can find comfort in the life choice you make.

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January 27, 2012

Soup On Sunday… a harvest of good taste for a great cause, benefitting Hospice & Palliative Care Charlotte Region

Filed under: Hospice,Senior Housing Events,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 12:31 pm

Enjoy soups from the Charlotte area’s finest restaurants. Purchase wonderful Soup on Sunday pottery. Sample culinary creations of students from Central Piedmont Community College, troche Johnson & Wales, and The Culinary Arts Institute.
Soup Lover’s Special: $40
(includes food, beverages, and handmade pottery bowl)
Adult General Admission: $30
(includes food and beverages)
Children, ages 7-12: $10
(ages 6 and under, free)

soup on sunday event

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January 13, 2012

Encompassing Mind, Body and Spirit

Filed under: Hospice,senior living guide — seniorlivingguide @ 12:02 pm

Embracing physical, emotional and spiritual needs is what hospice is about. At the end-of-life, the patient and their family have many questions, and want honesty, heartfelt kindness and sound medical advice. That’s why thousands of patients count on Bon Secours Hospice. However, many people don’t know that hospice is available or what is involved.

Who qualifies for hospice?
Anyone who has been diagnosed with a terminal illness or any illness where a cure is not currently possible.

What services are provided by hospice?
• Home visits by specially trained hospice nurses
• Pain management and symptom control
• Personal hygiene care from certified nursing assistants
• All medications related to the terminal diagnosis
• All specialized therapies required for the terminal diagnosis
• All durable medical equipment related to the terminal diagnosis
• Psychosocial, spiritual and grief support services

Who pays for hospice?
Hospice is a benefit under Medicare, Medicaid and many insurances. Bon Secours provides services regardless of a patient’s ability to pay.

How long is hospice care provided?
Generally, hospice care is offered when a physician certifies that a patient has a life expectancy of six months or less. However, care can be extended if the patient’s condition warrants.

How do I request hospice services?
You can ask your doctor to make a referral or call Bon Secours Hospice at (757) 889-HOME (4663).

Providing compassionate care since 1983, Bon Secours staff builds a close relationship with each family and patient based on trust, respect and an appreciation for each individual’s inherent dignity. We are about people – patients and families – and doing all we can to provide them with comfort, strength and support when it is needed most.
Bon Secours Hospice
Phone (757) 889-HOME (4663)
Fax (757) 213-7930
www.BonSecoursHamptonRoads.com

 

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