September 19, 2019

4 Ways to Help Make the Bathroom Safer for the Elderly

Filed under: Senior Safety — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 4:02 am

Seniors Bathroom SafetyBy Brooke Chaplan

For most elderly adults, the bathroom is one of the most dangerous areas in their homes. The combination of water and slippery surfaces such as tile poses a serious risk for falls. Seniors may also find it hard to steady themselves as they lower themselves to sit on a toilet or try to climb into a bathtub. Now that your loved one is getting older, you may need to make these four changes to his or her bathroom to protect him or her from injury.

Install a Comfort-Height Toilet

Older adults tend to struggle with health issues that make it hard to use the bathroom. For instance, seniors with arthritis will find it harder to lower themselves on to a toilet and stand back up. A comfort-height toilet reduces the strain on your loved one’s lower legs so that he or she is less likely to lose his or her balance while changing positions.

Do a Tub-to-Shower Conversion

Bathtubs often have high ledges that are hard for seniors to step over. Trying to step into the bathtub can also cause a senior to slip on a wet surface and fall. Tub-to-shower conversions are an effective way to instantly make your loved one’s personal hygiene routine safer. Roll-in showers eliminate any ledges that could cause your loved one to trip and fall. When you are planning your bathroom remodeling project, be sure to mention if your loved one has mobility issues. Your remodelers will have experience working with a variety of needs and may have other suggestions for improving mobility and safety.

Consider the Ease for Cleaning

As you plan the tub-to-shower conversion, be sure to think about the types of surfacing that you want in this new bathroom feature. Although tile is pretty, it requires grout that can be hard for seniors to keep clean. Consider having the shower installed with a smooth, grout-free surface that your loved one can easily wipe down. This eliminates the need for them to stand on a wet surface for an extended period of time. Of course, as people age, it becomes harder to bend and kneel to clean, so also consider ensuring that someone other than your aging loved one has to clean the floors in the bathroom.

Make Sure to Add Handrails

Your loved one may still lose his or her balance on non-skid surfacing. Seniors may also be apprehensive about showering if they have ever experienced a fall. Handrails give seniors support as they move around the bathroom. Be sure to add handrails near the toilet and in the shower so that your loved one always has a safe place to grab onto if he or she feels unsteady in the bathroom.

Making a few changes to your loved one’s bathroom is well worth the effort. With a safe bathroom set up, you can feel confident encouraging your loved one to live independently in his or her home. Once the bathroom is complete, just ask your loved one to let you know if he or she encounters any new challenges so that you can immediately respond to his or her needs.

 

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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September 17, 2019

What Are Your Options When a Loved One Develops Alzheimer’s?

Memory Care OptionsBy Anica Oaks

The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s in a loved one can be a disruptive event. You may have many concerns and questions about managing the condition at present and what will happen in the future. Fortunately, family members have several options to ensure their loved one receives appropriate care for their special needs.

Adult Day Care Centers

Adult day care center are a new concept that provides daytime caregiving for seniors and those with memory problems in a stimulating, social environment with trained personnel who supervise activities. Individuals can participate in a variety of group activities, which helps to provide mental stimulation and physical exercise.

Respite Care

Individuals who choose to provide full-time care for their loved one with Alzheimer’s may occasionally have other obligations that take them away from care. Respite care is a system that provides experienced, compassionate care for the loved one, while you are out of town or are taking a break from the demands of caregiving.

Assisted Living Care

Assisted living centers are facilities that offer separate living quarters for residents, but also a range of services to make every life more manageable for them. The facilities generally offer group dining rooms, housekeeping services, group activities and field trips to local events. Assisted living centers offer a measure of independence and privacy, but with ongoing supervision and medical support. They provide careful building security; which can be important for individuals who tend to wander.

At-Home Senior Care

Many seniors prefer to stay in their homes, and home health care agencies offer a variety of services to help these individuals receive necessary care in the comfort of their own homes. You can choose the level of senior care your loved needs and add more features, when needed. In-home caregivers can often be the best solution for working family members who still need to provide care for elders and are concerned about the disruption of changing the loved one’s living situation.

Nursing Home Care

Nursing home care provides comprehensive, 24-hour care for individuals who may be in the later stages of Alzheimer’s disease and need full time care. These facilities also have the ability to manage the medical problems that are involved in those who are dealing with Alzheimer’s disease.

Each family has their own needs, and the care needs of your loved one may change over time. Careful consideration of your loved one’s current situation, and consultation with the individual’s physician, can help you determine the best option to ensure their safety and health.

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September 12, 2019

Understanding the Different Types of Caregivers

Filed under: Caregivers,Home Health Care,Seniors — seniorlivingguide @ 2:46 pm

 

Caregiving for seniorsBy Brooke Chaplan 

There are different types of caregivers who can care for elderly or ill individuals. When you are considering hiring a caregiver for yourself or a loved one, think about the specialty areas of this health care career. Understanding the different types of caregivers will help you to choose the best individual for the job. Here are five types of caregivers who you can hire for yourself or an elderly loved one.

Live-in Caregiver Services

A live-in caregiver can provide services on a 24-hour basis seven days a week. This individual will live at and sleep in the home for long-term care or for temporary care. This variety of caregiver may also perform a variety of household duties that include cleaning tasks, laundry chores or shopping for food. Live-in caregivers are especially helpful for those who need constant assistance or care, but they do cost more due to the large time commitment involved.

Physical Therapy Caregiver Services

After someone has a stroke or an accident, the individual may need physical therapy care services to regain the use of the affected limbs or other body parts. A caregiver with an understanding of mobility issues can assist a client with exercises or other types of therapeutic services. A licensed physical therapist may teach the caregiver how to assist a client in his or her own home.

Occasional Caregiver Services

If you are responsible for caring for an elderly spouse or grandparent, then you may require respite services occasionally. This type of caregiver is only hired when you need a break from your daily responsibilities, and hiring one can give you a chance to do something different, including having fun for a day, or alternatively, something vital, including taking care of your own health needs. A respite caregiver may come and assist in the home, but can also come to an adult day care or health care facility, or just aide the family caregiver in providing assistance.

Routine Daily Caregiver Services

Infirm clients may need assistance with daily care tasks that include showering, brushing teeth or getting dressed. A caregiver may prepare nutritious meals, help a client eat and wash the dirty dishes. This is often part-time care that is only required for a few hours each day, and it may include having different caregivers throughout the week. This type of caregiver is often required for senior citizens who do not want to move to an assisted living environment.

Professional Transportation Caregiver Services

When an ill or injured individual requires frequent trips to hospitals, physician’s offices or other medical facilities, a professional transportation caregiver service is vital. This type of caregiver service may include having special vans that are equipped with wheelchair lifts and ramps. Some families are able to afford their own vehicles, but sometimes a professional service will be necessary.

How Do You Choose a Caregiver?

Choosing a caregiver can seem complicated, but if you talk to a physician and a home health care agency, then you can learn more about the process of hiring one. Make sure to think both about your needs as a caregiver and either your or your loved ones needs as a patient. Caregivers will be able to help you or a loved one have  the assistance and support needed.

Brooke Chaplan is a freelance writer and blogger. She lives and works out of her home in Los Lunas, New Mexico. She loves the outdoors and spends most of her time hiking, biking, and gardening. For more information, contact Brooke via Facebook at facebook.com/brooke.chaplan or Twitter @BrookeChaplan

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September 5, 2019

How to Find Home Care for Seniors That You Can Trust

Filed under: Aging in Place,Caregivers,Home Health Care — Tags: — seniorlivingguide @ 4:31 am

Find Home Care for Seniors That You Can Trust

By Lizzie Weakley

When you are responsible for finding home care for a loved one, you will want to find caregivers who you can trust. Fortunately, there are other individuals who have had the same situation, and they offer excellent advice for finding the right type of care for your loved one. Here are five tips that you can use to help you find a great caregiver.

Talk to a Physician

When you have an appointment with the senior’s physician, you can ask about the best way to find a caregiver. A physician can provide information about senior care services for patients with dementia conditions, brain trauma from a stroke or terminal conditions such as cancer. Call each nursing home to learn more about the services, and also, schedule appointments to visit the nursing homes.

Ask Your Friends

Many adults are caring for older relatives, so you can ask your friends about the caregivers that they use. Some cities have senior day care centers where you can take a loved one while you are working. There are also organizations that have volunteers who will assist with senior home care occasionally. Make a list of the different places that are recommended by your friends so that you can contact each place for more information.

In-home Caregivers

You can contact an agency that has a list of trained caregivers available. These individuals have already had criminal background screening, and the office staff at the agency has verified that the caregivers have references. In just a few days, you can have a great caregiver for your loved one who recently had surgery or has dementia. Elderly home care is available each day, or you may need part-time services instead.

Interview Caregivers

It is important to interview the caregivers to find an individual who meets the needs of the senior citizen. Some caregivers excel at caring for individuals with physical problems such as severe arthritis while others are able to cope better with a senior who has Alzheimer’s disease. Finding the right caregiver can make your loved one happier and healthier.

Consult with the Senior Citizen

Your loved one should provide some input into selecting a caregiver. Remember that you probably won’t stay in the home all of the time to observe what is going on, so they should select a caregiver instead. Despite having a dementia condition or physical health issues, it is essential for your loved one to have a good experience with selecting a caregiver.

Maintain Communication

It is a good idea to maintain communication with a caregiver by making telephone calls occasionally, or alternatively, by stopping by your loved one’s home at different times of the day or the night.

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