August 21, 2013

Four Progressive Ways Healthcare Has Changed in 2013

Filed under: Boomer,Healthcare,Seniors — seniorlivingguide @ 8:06 am

Courtesy of Hannah Whittenly [hannahwhittenly@gmail.com]

With subsidies and tax penalties tied to the Affordable Care Act due to begin in 2014, sales many people are thinking about their health insurance coverage. Some of the biggest shifts in health care are currently in effect, with escalation due next year. Four of the biggest changes are outlined below.

Lower Cost
It is projected that health care will cost the United States around three trillion dollars in 2013. While that rate is about four percent more than in 2012, it represents the slowest rate of cost growth in many years. Actuaries have stated that the lower rate is tied more to lagging income than the Affordable Care Act. This lag has Americans being more choosy about when to see a doctor or obtain other health services, especially with some concerns over HIPAA and texting.

healthcareIncreased Medicare Taxes
In addition to the 7.65 percent tax all workers pay into Medicare, with 1.45 percent going for hospitalization, those earning $200,000 ($250,000 jointly) or more in 2013 will kick in another 0.9 percent. The same income group will also be taxed 3.8 percent on money made from investments. Together, these new taxes are expected to bring in over $200 billion in the next 10 years.

Raise for Medicaid Doctors
With an expected increase of seven million enrollees in Medicaid, the government wants to ensure there will be an adequate supply of primary care doctors. This is the purpose of a provision written into Obamacare that will give doctors participating in Medicaid an average 73 percent raise. Another bright spot for providers is the secure text messaging apps that are now available that will speed up care while keeping information private.

Clear Plan Outlines
In the past, one of the most confusing aspects of health insurance was deciphering the lengthy forms and explanations of coverage. Insurance companies are now required to provide a benefits summary, explained in clear terms, that does not exceed four pages. It is similar in concept to the nutritional labels available for food. This requirement began in the fall of 2012 for plans with open enrollment at that time, with the rest catching up in 2013.

The Affordable Care Act was created to make health care available and economically feasible for as many people as possible. It is a progressive step forward that will bring benefit to all Americans.

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Four Tips for Maintaining Strong and Healthy Bones

Filed under: Boomer,Seniors — seniorlivingguide @ 8:02 am

Courtesy of Hannah Whittenly [hannahwhittenly@gmail.com]

Did you know osteoporosis and the precursor osteopenia impact more than 44 million people in the United States. The weak and brittle bones associated with these conditions leads to at least two million bone fractures annually, discount according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. Thankfully, look there are a variety of ways to avoid osteoporosis altogether. The following are four helpful tips for how you can take steps to build stronger bones that will create a healthy support system for your whole body.

1. Drink up Your Milk
Milk provides many of the building blocks necessary to create strong bones. It is full of calcium and Vitamin D, which helps the body absorb the calcium in milk. These two ingredients work together to build and repair the bones of the body, while also keeping muscles strong to reduce the risk of falling accidents. You should try to aim for 1,200 milligrams of calcium, or about four glasses of nonfat milk, in your diet every day. If you are lactose intolerant or are not a fan of milk, you may want to consider taking natural joint supplements like those at naturessunshine.com.

2. Eat Meat in Moderation
Calcium and phosphorous resources in the body are used for digesting animal proteins that are found in meats. Therefore, consuming too much strong bonesred meat, poultry, pork, or fish will significantly lower the amount of calcium left in your bones. The best plan of action is to limit the amount of meat you eat to just twice a day. Remember that portions should be small, around 3 ounces or the size of your fist.

3. Step Away from the Salt Shaker
Cutting back on the amount of sodium intake in your diet will work wonders for your bones. Too much sodium often causes the calcium to leach out of your bones and leave the body through urine. In order to keep the calcium in your body and not in the toilet, maintain a low-sodium diet free of processed foods.

4. Keep Your Bones Active
Exercise activities that force you to bear your weight and work against gravity have been proven to strengthen bones. These activities stimulate the osteoblasts, which are bone-building cells within the body. Incorporate high-impact fun exercises, like tennis, basketball, and kickboxing into your workout regimen to build strong bones fast.

Since bones begin to reach their peak density in the 20s, start young to ensure that your bones stay healthy for the rest of your long life. Keep up your bone density levels by utilizing the above tips that will give you strong bones and lower your future risk of developing osteoporosis.

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