February 20, 2018

Is A Continuing Care Community Right for You?

By: Darleen Mahoney

I am on my own personal journey to discover what the best decisions are for my Dad. He is 71 years old and starting to decline both physically and mentally. He decided to be independent and retire in a 55+ restrictive community years ago, but I see the need for additional long-term services for him in the near future. On this journey, I found myself needing a clear vision on what are our options might be that would be best for him and his needs.

I started looking at continuing care community options – what they entail and if it would be a good fit. I regretted that this option was not considered years ago and wondered if it was too late for him to make this move.

Continuing care communities are independent living housing with all the perks of the social, recreational and other retirement community extras that keep independent seniors active. They also have two additional tiers of care available – assisted living and nursing level care. Later, if the independentContinuing Care Retirement Community senior’s health declines, they can smoothly transition to the assisted living tier, and then, the nursing side, if needed.

According to the AARP, “Nearly 90% of people 65 and older said they would like to ‘age in place.’ And yet the hard truth is that a beloved house in a familiar community can become both physically impractical and socially isolating over time”. http://time.com/money/4579934/continuing-care-retirement-communities-cost/

Once you decide that this is a viable option for you or your loved one to explore, it’s a matter of choosing which one would be right for you.

The AARP recommends that you take many steps to make this determination:

https://www.aarp.org/home-garden/housing/info-08-2009/ginzler_housing_choices.html

  • Visit multiple residences
  • Take a tour, talk to the residents, staff, and visiting family members.
  • Ask staff members how long they’ve worked there; a good sign of quality is low turnover.
  • Check with the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. Many assisted-living residences, nursing homes, and CCRCs voluntarily apply for accreditation, which means they meet many quality measures.
  • Get clear information on financial arrangements and costs
  • Discuss at length with your loved ones, they will help you make a good decision in your best interest.

Regardless of whether a continuing care community is right for you or your loved one, it’s always best to be informed and proactive when making plans of this magnitude. Their health and happiness in the long term is dependent on finding the best senior living arrangement.

When you’re ready to begin your search, remember SeniorLivingGuide.com – the nation’s fastest growing senior housing and services resource!

Share

Is A Continuing Care Community Right for You?

By: Darleen Mahoney

I am on my own personal journey to discover what the best decisions are for my Dad. He is 71 years old and starting to decline both physically and mentally. He decided to be independent and retire in a 55+ restrictive community years ago, but I see the need for additional long-term services for him in the near future. On this journey, I found myself needing a clear vision on what are our options might be that would be best for him and his needs.

I started looking at continuing care community options – what they entail and if it would be a good fit. I regretted that this option was not considered years ago and wondered if it was too late for him to make this move.

Continuing care communities are independent living housing with all the perks of the social, recreational and other retirement community extras that keep independent seniors active. They also have two additional tiers of care available – assisted living and nursing level care. Later, if the independentContinuing Care Retirement Community senior’s health declines, they can smoothly transition to the assisted living tier, and then, the nursing side, if needed.

According to the AARP, “Nearly 90% of people 65 and older said they would like to ‘age in place.’ And yet the hard truth is that a beloved house in a familiar community can become both physically impractical and socially isolating over time”. http://time.com/money/4579934/continuing-care-retirement-communities-cost/

Once you decide that this is a viable option for you or your loved one to explore, it’s a matter of choosing which one would be right for you.

The AARP recommends that you take many steps to make this determination:

https://www.aarp.org/home-garden/housing/info-08-2009/ginzler_housing_choices.html

  • Visit multiple residences
  • Take a tour, talk to the residents, staff, and visiting family members.
  • Ask staff members how long they’ve worked there; a good sign of quality is low turnover.
  • Check with the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. Many assisted-living residences, nursing homes, and CCRCs voluntarily apply for accreditation, which means they meet many quality measures.
  • Get clear information on financial arrangements and costs
  • Discuss at length with your loved ones, they will help you make a good decision in your best interest.

Regardless of whether a continuing care community is right for you or your loved one, it’s always best to be informed and proactive when making plans of this magnitude. Their health and happiness in the long term is dependent on finding the best senior living arrangement.

When you’re ready to begin your search, remember SeniorLivingGuide.com – the nation’s fastest growing senior housing and services resource!

Share

February 12, 2018

Keeping Your Heart Healthy-February is American Heart Month

Filed under: boomer,SeniorLivingGuide.com,Seniors,Seniors Health — seniorlivingguide @ 4:25 pm

By: Darleen Mahoney

I could review the statistics of heart disease in America and the surprising fact that women are more prone to die from heart disease than men or that it is the leading cause of death over cancer. Yes, that’s right! Cancer!
“In the United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. In fact, coronary heart disease (CHD)—the most common type of heart disease—is the #1 killer of both men and women in the United States”. (https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/heart-disease-women).

At the end of the day, the important facts that we need to know are how to help Seniors Heart Healthprevent heart disease in our everyday lives and the signs that we may be in “trouble” and need to seek medical attention.
Preventing heart disease can be challenging for those who are conditioned to living an unhealthy lifestyle based on their choices of food, alcohol, exercise, etc. Getting healthy doesn’t happen overnight and must become a way of living, not a short-term solution to a medical issue.

Healthy living choices to help prevent heart disease include:
● Eat healthy.
● Get active.
● Stay at a healthy weight.
● Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
● Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
● If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
● Manage stress.

Have you ever been surprised to hear that someone who was “perfectly healthy” died of a heart attack? The people close to that person said, “he was never diagnosed with cardiovascular disease, we all thought he was perfectly healthy. Who knew?” Everyone is shocked when this happens. This is because someone might not be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease until he or she has a heart attack, stroke, heart failure or angina. Therefore, watching for heart disease symptoms prior to a heart event is critical.

According to Mayo Clinic, (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20353118), symptoms in men and women can be different. Men will more likely have chest pain, while women may experience chest pain/discomfort along with shortness of breath, nausea, and extreme fatigue.

Other symptoms may include:
● Pain, numbness, weakness or coldness in your legs or arms if the blood vessels in those parts of your body are narrowed
● Pain in the neck, jaw, throat, upper abdomen or back

There are also various other symptoms for different types of heart disease:
● abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmia’s)
● heart muscle (dilated cardiomyopathy)
● valvular heart disease
● heart infections

In a nutshell, all these different types of heart disease have 3 symptoms in common and they are your keys to knowing that you need to seek medical attention right away. They are chest pains, shortness of breath, and fainting.
Heart disease can be treated more proactively when treated early on. Contacting your doctor to discuss your heart health concerns is being proactive in a longer, happier, healthier heart and life.

Share

February 5, 2018

Home Staging for Seniors: Best Practices for Bigger Returns

By: Darleen Mahoney

Once it’s been decided that potentially downsizing for retirement living or moving into a senior living community is on the horizon, the most stressful aspect can be selling the home. There are many things to consider outside of the emotional tolls of leaving a home with years of memories attached. There is also the reality that the house itself is most likely the largest source of income/equity, therefore, its very important to sell the house at the best price that the market will allow.

Staging a home and making it more appealing to a wide range of buyers is a best practice and that may be challenging for some Seniors while they are still living in the home. There are a few options for staging a home. It can range from keeping living spaces very organized and decluttered and quick paint fixes to having a professional “stage” the home for sale. Typically, a service will stage a home to make it look larger, utilize neutral colors and will take any personal items of the current homeowner and put them away. These services may replace existing furniture and other personal items which can be stressful for Seniors but can also raise the value of the home. Buyers should not focus on the current homeowner’s taste, style and personal choices.

If a Senior is moving to an Assisted Living community, they will most likely need to downsize right away. This can be such a taxing process both emotionally and physically. According to AARP https://www.aarp.org/work/retirement-planning/info-08-2011/retirement-downsizing.html , it’s recommended that you plan to, “hit the ‘heart of the home’ rooms first. That’s usually the kitchen, living room, and family room, which tend to be the most cluttered and contain items with the greatest emotional value and everyday use. Make four piles-keep, donate, give to family members and trash.”

Other things to consider while staging is touching up paint, changing out hardware, new blinds, replacing burned out lightbulbs, adding fresh flowers or potted plants, fixing visible issues around the house that a buyer would notice, and rearranging furniture to create the look of a larger space. Best practice is to keep in mind that when a potential buyer walks through your home, they need to be able to picture their own personal items and sense of style as well. If there is a strong color palette in the home, it may be necessary to re-paint a more neutral palette to assure that the potential buyer is seeing the actual house and not just the wall colors.

Also, consider the front of the house. A potential buyer should never drive up and before they even enter the house think, “what a lot of work” before entering the home.

Remember the most important things in staging with Seniors is that there may be more emotional attachments to their personal tastes and their personal items Its important to be cognizant of that and walk through the process at their pace while explaining why “staging” will only benefit them in the long run.

Share

January 29, 2018

Keeping Our Seniors Healthy Through Meal Delivery Options

Filed under: Meal Delivery for Seniors,SeniorLivingGuide.com,Seniors — seniorlivingguide @ 1:31 pm

By: Darleen Mahoney

Recently our website, SeniorLivingGuide.com, added a chat box. We decided to have a very hands on approach to this as we wanted to have our own team answering and interacting with our online visitors and we also wanted to have additional insight to what our visitors were looking for when visiting our website. Our online chats have been very eye opening in the inquiries that our online visitors need help with even beyond the scope of housing needs.

Meal delivery for Seniors has been a topic that our team has recently assisted in.

Why is this important to Seniors?meal delivery for seniors at home

Why are more seniors or their caregivers choosing delivery services for health reasons?

Some of the reasons would be out of necessity. They do not have the ability to prepare healthy meals due to their own health reasons or they are overwhelmed with caring for their spouse. Some choose to do so because they would like to take a more relaxing approach to the kitchen in their retirement years and do not want to sacrifice nutritional benefits.

What should be considered?

  • Diets– multiple health reasons can limit one’s diet options, choosing a delivery service that takes these seriously in their food prep, but still can provide tasty food would be ideal.
  • Affordability-Meal delivery may be a more affordable option than eating out. For some Seniors, there are also services such as Meals On Wheels mealsonwheelsamerica.org.
  • Taste– This is very important in choosing a delivery service, does it taste good? If not, continue looking at different options. There are many websites such as, momsmeals.com and www.diana-food.com , that may offer healthy solutions to meal delivery.

If meal delivery is not ideal, there may be other options for Seniors in receiving meals:

  • Senior Centers/Church-sometimes your local Senior Center or Church will offer meals, but they typically do not deliver. Transportation would be necessary, and the menu is not specialized to taste and dietary needs.
  • Mailed Food Services– There are so many of these being advertised that is can be overwhelming! Many of them still require plenty of time spent on food prep and may negate the whole purpose of food delivery and they can be expensive in the long run.

According to www.ncoa.org/economic-security/beneifts/food-and-nutrition/senior-nutrition/, “Giving your body the right nutrients and maintaining a healthy weight can help Seniors stay active and independent. Seniors will also spend less time and money at the doctor.”

Share

January 26, 2018

SeniorLivingGuide.Com Gives Back!

Filed under: Case Managers,SeniorLivingGuide.com,Social Workers — seniorlivingguide @ 10:56 am

By: Darleen Mahoney

SeniorLivingGuide.Com has a heart for the Social Workers and Case Managers that connect daily with our Seniors. We know how hard they work every day. We also know how unappreciated they may feel at times; therefore, we are celebrating them! It is our mission to let them know that they are valuable and appreciated. SeniorLivingGuide.Com sponsors 20 Annual Social Worker/Case Manager Appreciation Luncheon’s.  That’s right, there are 20 luncheons across 3 States.  These lunches happen once a year in 14 locations in Florida, 3 times in North Carolina and 3 times in Virginia. There will be multiple companies at this event to support them with valuable resources, a delicious meal and best of all, prizes! For more information and to register for this one-of-a kind event, visit www.eventinginc.com.  SeniorLivingGuide.Com extends a very profound thank you to all these folks for their hard work, tenacity, and tireless hours they spend on behalf of our seniors.

Share

January 22, 2018

Tips for Budgeting In Retirement

Filed under: boomer,Healthcare,retirement,senior housing — seniorlivingguide @ 11:40 am

By: Darleen Mahoney
www.SeniorLivingGuide.com

Being financially prepared before and during retirement is integral in assuring a comfortable and less stressful “golden years”.

Knowing what your retirement bills will look like verses your work life bills and expenses are helpful in budgeting. You may save money on commuting expenses and buying expensive clothes, work lunches and multiple co-worker “life events” financial contributions, but what is the offset in your income?

The first thing you would want to do is assess your finances. Any good budget begins with understanding of your current income and expenses.

Senior housing retirement budget

Your biggest expense in retirement will most likely be your housing. If you can pay off your mortgage before retirement this will eliminate your biggest monthly expense. If you are unable to do this, you might find it beneficial to downsize and decrease your monthly mortgage, cashing in on any equity to help build up your nest egg. You may also want to consider retirement living and active adult retirement communities as options as they can offer turnkey solutions for long term home stability.

The other biggest expense during retirement will be health care expenses. It is imperative to do a deep dive into what is available to you, especially if you retire before being eligible for Medicare. You may also want to consider budgeting and saving for long term care expenses, as you or your spouse may need them.

Tracking your expenses with online budgeting tools can also be a real eye opener on where your money may be going. Budgeting tools like Mint and You Need a Budget will sync with your bank account and will be able to track where your money goes. https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/on-retirement/articles/2016-08-10/7-tips-for-budgeting-in-retirement

Additional recommendations you might want to consider:
• Have fun-watching TV is not a healthy way to live and these should truly be the years that you have worked so hard for!
• Emergencies! – Big ticket items like New AC, Car repairs, new refrigerator, etc.
• Avoid Debt!

Most retirees have a fixed budget where they may live on a month to month income, creating a budget and being prepared will allow you the opportunity to enjoy your retirement with less financial stress.

Share

January 15, 2018

Recognizing Depression in Our Elderly and How to Help Them

By: Darleen Mahoney
www.SeniorLivingGuide.com

Depression is a common problem in older adults. It may be difficult to distinguish the difference between a senior who is just feeling “sad” and one who is experiencing geriatric depression. Geriatric depression is a mental or emotional disorder affecting older adults. These seniors that are would fall under “high risk” might be those that have experienced strokes, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, diabetes, cancer, dementia, and chronic pain. There are specific signs that would tend to be lend more to geriatric depression over moments of sadness. It is important to be aware of these signs because there are also steps to take to help our Seniors, depression is not a normal stage to getting older. Their “golden year” should be just that…golden!

Some signs and symptoms to look for would include: decreased energy levels, more physical problems, such as arthritis and headaches. Other signs that need to be addressed quite seriously would be loss of self-worth, slowed speech, increasing alcohol intake or drugs, thoughts of suicide.

Because depression is not normal and addressing them with our elderly can be tricky, pay attention to signs other than verbal.

“Older adults often say, ‘I am not sad,” or ‘I am not lonely,’ because they do not want to be a burden on the family,”

“Instead, they show signs of distress by wringing their hands excessively, getting agitated or irritable, or having difficulty sitting still.” according to Dr. Strem (www.health.com/health).

Be vigilant of these types of communication signs as well as the physical signs to be more proactive in care and getting the help needed.

The good news is there is help! There are medications as well as lifestyle changes!

Medications Include: www.healthline.com/health/depression/elderly#treatment5

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)
  • Selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)
  • Tricyclic antidepressants
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)
  • Bupropion
  • Mirtazapine

Lifestyle Changes Include: www.healthline.com/health/depression/elderly#treatment5

  • Increased physical activity
  • Finding a new hobby or interest
  • Having regular visits with family and friends
  • Getting enough sleep daily
  • Eating a well-balanced diet

If you think that you or your loved one is suffering from geriatric depression, encourage treatment and offer your support. If they are living in a Retirement community, Assisted Living facility, or any type of senior housing environment where you might have access to reach out for help, then please do so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/depression/elderly#Diagnosis4

Share

December 18, 2017

A Dozen Holiday Tips for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Filed under: Uncategorized — seniorlivingguide @ 4:48 pm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Emily Mesiano emesiano@alz.org

(ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 18, 2017)- While holiday celebrations are often joyous occasions, they can be challenging and stressful for the five million Americans currently living with Alzheimer’s and their families. The symptoms of this progressive brain disease can sometimes make holiday celebrations or travel more difficult, but it doesn’t mean the whole family can’t participate in holiday festivities.

The Alzheimer’s Association Central North Florida Chapter encourages families to try implementing the following tips for a happy and memorable holiday for everyone.

Tips for holiday celebrations:

Make sure others know. Let guests know what to expect before they arrive and tell them how they can help. For example, what activities can they do with the person with Alzheimer’s or how best to communicate with them.

Build on traditions and memories. Take time to adapt, or create new traditions that might be less stressful or a better fit with your caregiving responsibilities. For example, if evening confusion and agitation are a problem, turn your holiday dinner into a holiday lunch.

Involve the person with Alzheimer’s. Depending on abilities and preferences, make sure to keep the person with Alzheimer’s involved in the celebrations, such as packing cookies in tins or helping wrap gifts.

Plan ahead. When attending a holiday party, prepare the host for special needs, such as a quiet room for the person to rest, away from noise and distractions.

Tips for travel:

Stick with the familiar. Travel to known destinations. Try to visit places that are familiar.

Be prepared. Create an itinerary that includes details. Make sure your loved one’s medications are easily accessible. Keep comfort items close by, in case he or she becomes anxious during travel.

Pick the right time. Consider the time of day that your loved one is at their best, and schedule your time of departure during those hours to prevent possible confusion and agitation.

Avoid layovers. If unavoidable, ask about airport escort services.

Ask for help. Notifying hotel and airline staff that the person you’re traveling with has Alzheimer’s disease and request necessary accommodation during your trip.

Ensure a Safe Return. Changes in environment can trigger wandering. Enroll in MedicAlert® + Alzheimer’s Association Safe Return®.

Find local support. Before you travel, reach out to the Alzheimer’s Association chapter at your destination.

Contact the 24/7 Helpline. As always, the Alzheimer’s Association is here to help, contact the Helpline with any questions or concerns. 1.800.272.3900

For more tips and information visit: https://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-dementia-holidays.asp

###

Alzheimer’s Association®

The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. Visit alz.org or call 800.272.3900.

Share

November 16, 2017

Thank YOU from SeniorLivingGuide.com

Filed under: Uncategorized — seniorlivingguide @ 2:26 pm

Happy Thanksgiving to you!

Share
Older Posts »

 

Home | Privacy | Disclaimer | Advertising | Media Kit | Definitions | Help | Contact
Copyright ©2009 Fairfax Publishing Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
The Nations Premier Online Senior Housing Resource

  • RSS
  • Facebook
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • YouTube